Whitney Museum of American Art

Apr 17

Established in 2000 by longtime Whitney trustee Melva Bucksbaum and her family, the Bucksbaum Award is given every two years in recognition of an artist, chosen from those included in the Biennial, whose work demonstrates a singular combination of talent and imagination. Paul Pfeiffer was the first artist to win the prestigious prize. The 2014 Bucksbaum Award will be presented on May 21. 
Paul Pfeiffer (b. 1966), Race Riot, 2001 (installation view, Paul Pfeiffer, December 13, 2001–February 24, 2002, Whitney Museum of American Art, NY), Digital camcorder and vitrine with digital video; color, silent. Private Collection. © Paul Pfeiffer. Photography by Geoffrey Clements

Established in 2000 by longtime Whitney trustee Melva Bucksbaum and her family, the Bucksbaum Award is given every two years in recognition of an artist, chosen from those included in the Biennial, whose work demonstrates a singular combination of talent and imagination. Paul Pfeiffer was the first artist to win the prestigious prize. The 2014 Bucksbaum Award will be presented on May 21. 

Paul Pfeiffer (b. 1966), Race Riot, 2001 (installation view, Paul Pfeiffer, December 13, 2001–February 24, 2002, Whitney Museum of American Art, NY), Digital camcorder and vitrine with digital video; color, silent. Private Collection. © Paul Pfeiffer. Photography by Geoffrey Clements

Apr 16

“The good thing about being an artist, is it’s a legitimate way of looking at things cross-eyed.” — John Chamberlain, born today in 1927.

Apr 14

“Bronze is a kind of beautiful alchemical wizardry.” —2014 Biennial artist Ricky Swallow

“Bronze is a kind of beautiful alchemical wizardry.” —2014 Biennial artist Ricky Swallow

Tickets for our annual Art Party on May 8 are on sale now! Proceeds support the Whitney’s Independent Study Program and other education initiatives.

Tickets for our annual Art Party on May 8 are on sale now! Proceeds support the Whitney’s Independent Study Program and other education initiatives.

Apr 12

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Apr 11

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Apr 10

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Apr 09

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Apr 08

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Apr 07

Invited to assemble a “show within a show” for the 2014 Biennial, Julie Ault selected as points of entry works by David Wojnarowicz (1954–1992) and Martin Wong (1946–1999) from the Whitney’s permanent collection, exhibiting them alongside artifacts from these artists’ personal archives, held by the Downtown Collection at New York University’s Fales Library.
Marvin J. Taylor is an archiving activist and the director of the Fales Library and Special Collections at New York University. Read a conversation between Taylor and Ault, which is part of Ault’s contribution to the 2014 Biennial.
Julie Ault, Afterlife: a constellation, 2014 (installation view, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York). Courtesy the artist

Invited to assemble a “show within a show” for the 2014 Biennial, Julie Ault selected as points of entry works by David Wojnarowicz (1954–1992) and Martin Wong (1946–1999) from the Whitney’s permanent collection, exhibiting them alongside artifacts from these artists’ personal archives, held by the Downtown Collection at New York University’s Fales Library.

Marvin J. Taylor is an archiving activist and the director of the Fales Library and Special Collections at New York University. Read a conversation between Taylor and Ault, which is part of Ault’s contribution to the 2014 Biennial.

Julie Ault, Afterlife: a constellation, 2014 (installation view, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York). Courtesy the artist

Apr 06

For over four decades, Channa Horwitz produced works using a rigid formal vocabulary of her devising, built on a standardized grid and a system of notations based on the numbers 1 through 8, each assigned its own color. Horwitz developed the system as a way of marking and expressing time, movement, and rhythm.

For over four decades, Channa Horwitz produced works using a rigid formal vocabulary of her devising, built on a standardized grid and a system of notations based on the numbers 1 through 8, each assigned its own color. Horwitz developed the system as a way of marking and expressing time, movement, and rhythm.

Apr 05

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Apr 04

This week, Academy Records presents two works running simultaneously in the Film and Video Gallery. The Bower, a film loop of blossoming cherry trees, plays continuously over the three-hour audio work No Jets, a field recording of the flight path to Chicago’s O’Hare airport during the flight delay after the September 11, 2001 attacks.
Academy Records, still from The Bower, 2011-13. 16mm film, color, silent; approx. 1:30 minutes, looped. Collection of the artist. Courtesy the artist. © Stephen Lacy

This week, Academy Records presents two works running simultaneously in the Film and Video Gallery. The Bower, a film loop of blossoming cherry trees, plays continuously over the three-hour audio work No Jets, a field recording of the flight path to Chicago’s O’Hare airport during the flight delay after the September 11, 2001 attacks.

Academy Records, still from The Bower, 2011-13. 16mm film, color, silent; approx. 1:30 minutes, looped. Collection of the artist. Courtesy the artist. © Stephen Lacy

Apr 03

This Saturday, bring your kids to celebrate what’s happening now in contemporary art at our 2014 Biennial Family Party. Families will participate in interactive tours, gallery activities, and an art workshop. 
Keith Mayerson (b. 1966), My Family, 2013. Oil on linen, 56 × 70 in. © Keith Mayerson; courtesy the artist and Derek Eller Gallery, NY. Photograph by Tom Powel Imaging

This Saturday, bring your kids to celebrate what’s happening now in contemporary art at our 2014 Biennial Family Party. Families will participate in interactive tours, gallery activities, and an art workshop. 

Keith Mayerson (b. 1966), My Family, 2013. Oil on linen, 56 × 70 in. © Keith Mayerson; courtesy the artist and Derek Eller Gallery, NY. Photograph by Tom Powel Imaging

For the first Biennial, artists—among them Grant Wood, Arshile Gorky, and Georgia O’Keeffe—were invited to submit works of their own choosing, continuing the tradition of nonjuried exhibitions surveying new American art which began at the Whitney Studio Club in 1918.
Installation view of the First Biennial Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting, November 23, 1932–January 5, 1933, Whitney Museum of American Art

For the first Biennial, artists—among them Grant Wood, Arshile Gorky, and Georgia O’Keeffe—were invited to submit works of their own choosing, continuing the tradition of nonjuried exhibitions surveying new American art which began at the Whitney Studio Club in 1918.

Installation view of the First Biennial Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting, November 23, 1932–January 5, 1933, Whitney Museum of American Art