Whitney Museum of American Art

Jul 22

Today, the two artists with whom the Whitney has been most closely identified were born: Edward Hopper in 1882 and Alexander Calder in 1898. You can see their work on the fifth-floor mezzanine. 

Today, the two artists with whom the Whitney has been most closely identified were born: Edward Hopper in 1882 and Alexander Calder in 1898. You can see their work on the fifth-floor mezzanine

Jul 20

Detail of Jeff Koons's Play-Doh (1994–2014) via lizacharlesworth1.

Detail of Jeff Koons's Play-Doh (1994–2014) via lizacharlesworth1.

Jul 19

Lost dog!

Lost dog!

Jul 18

Teens are invited to explore Jeff Koons: A Retrospective during a free event tomorrow. More info on whitney.org.
Jeff Koons (b. 1955), Olive Oyl, 2003. Oil on canvas; 108 × 84 in. (274.3 × 213.4 cm). Private collection. © Jeff Koons

Teens are invited to explore Jeff Koons: A Retrospective during a free event tomorrow. More info on whitney.org.

Jeff Koons (b. 1955), Olive Oyl, 2003. Oil on canvas; 108 × 84 in. (274.3 × 213.4 cm). Private collection. © Jeff Koons

Jul 17

The fifth-floor galleries reopen today with three new exhibitions. Shaping a Collection: Five Decades of Gifts includes iconic works by Jean-Michel Basquiat, Ed Ruscha, Andy Warhol, and many others. The fifth-floor mezzanine galleries will sample the Whitney’s holdings of work by Edward Hopper, whose work will be shown alongside examples of contemporary photography, and Alexander Calder.
Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Second Story Sunlight, 1960. Oil on canvas. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Friends of the Whitney Museum of American Art. © Whitney Museum of American Art. Photograph by Sheldan C. Collins

The fifth-floor galleries reopen today with three new exhibitions. Shaping a Collection: Five Decades of Gifts includes iconic works by Jean-Michel Basquiat, Ed Ruscha, Andy Warhol, and many others. The fifth-floor mezzanine galleries will sample the Whitney’s holdings of work by Edward Hopper, whose work will be shown alongside examples of contemporary photography, and Alexander Calder.

Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Second Story Sunlight, 1960. Oil on canvas. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Friends of the Whitney Museum of American Art. © Whitney Museum of American Art. Photograph by Sheldan C. Collins

Jul 16

Three Brillo Boxes and Three Flags! Shaping a Collection: Five Decades of Gifts opens tomorrow.

Three Brillo Boxes and Three Flags! Shaping a Collection: Five Decades of Gifts opens tomorrow.

“Photography is nature seen from the eyes outward, painting from the eyes inward.” — Charles Sheeler, born today in 1883.

Jul 14

“Art is something that happens inside us. We look at things in the world, and we become excited by them. We understand our own possibilities of becoming. And that’s what art is.” — Jeff Koons to The New York Times

Jul 12

The installation for Shaping a Collection: Five Decades of Gifts is well underway! Here’s Andy Warhol’s Ethel Scull 36 Times at the final stage of installation. Each photograph is a discreet panel and the panels of each row are fixed together. The rows are installed from the bottom up.

The installation for Shaping a Collection: Five Decades of Gifts is well underway! Here’s Andy Warhol’s Ethel Scull 36 Times at the final stage of installation. Each photograph is a discreet panel and the panels of each row are fixed together. The rows are installed from the bottom up.

Jul 11

Examining the breadth and depth of thirty-five years of work by Jeff Koons, one of the most influential and controversial artists of the twentieth century, the Jeff Koons: A Retrospective exhibition catalogue features all of the artist’s most well-known pieces. 
Read the introductory essay by curator Scott Rothkopf on whitney.org.

Examining the breadth and depth of thirty-five years of work by Jeff Koons, one of the most influential and controversial artists of the twentieth century, the Jeff Koons: A Retrospective exhibition catalogue features all of the artist’s most well-known pieces. 

Read the introductory essay by curator Scott Rothkopf on whitney.org.

Jul 10

We want to see YOU in Jeff Koons: A Retrospective! Share your photos with the hashtags #Koons #ArtSelfie, and we’ll regram our favs every week. Don’t forget to tag @whitneymuseum. 

We want to see YOU in Jeff Koons: A Retrospective! Share your photos with the hashtags #Koons #ArtSelfie, and we’ll regram our favs every week. Don’t forget to tag @whitneymuseum

Jul 09

“What an artist is trying to do for people is to bring them closer to something, because art is about sharing: you wouldn’t be an artist unless you wanted to share an experience, a thought.” — David Hockney, born today in 1937.

Jul 08

For his Banality series, Jeff Koons worked with traditional German and Italian craftsmen to enlarge the subjects and render them in gilt porcelain and polychromed wood, materials more associated with housewares and tchotchkes than contemporary art.
Photograph via mcmondays.

For his Banality series, Jeff Koons worked with traditional German and Italian craftsmen to enlarge the subjects and render them in gilt porcelain and polychromed wood, materials more associated with housewares and tchotchkes than contemporary art.

Photograph via mcmondays.

Jul 07

The Museum is closed today, but you can still get a sneak peek at Jeff Koons: A Retrospective. Here’s the monumental painting, Tulips (1995–98), which is hanging over our restaurant. 

The Museum is closed today, but you can still get a sneak peek at Jeff Koons: A Retrospective. Here’s the monumental painting, Tulips (1995–98), which is hanging over our restaurant. 

Jul 05

"A strong case for the rigor and, often, the beauty of Koons’s art." The New Yorker reviews Jeff Koons: A Retrospective.
Jeff Koons (b. 1955), Rabbit, 1986. Stainless steel; 41 × 19 × 12 in. (104.1 × 48.3 × 30.5 cm). Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago; partial gift of Stefan T. Edlis and H. Gael Neeson, 2000.21. © Jeff Koons

"A strong case for the rigor and, often, the beauty of Koons’s art." The New Yorker reviews Jeff Koons: A Retrospective.

Jeff Koons (b. 1955), Rabbit, 1986. Stainless steel; 41 × 19 × 12 in. (104.1 × 48.3 × 30.5 cm). Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago; partial gift of Stefan T. Edlis and H. Gael Neeson, 2000.21. © Jeff Koons