1. A peek at the second floor galleries of Jeff Koons: A Retrospective

  2. Art Everywhere U.S. launched today! A total of fifty-eight artworks will pop up through the month of August on 50,000 displays nationwide, including static and digital billboards, subway platforms and trains, buses and bus shelters. Keep your eyes peeled! 

    Art Everywhere U.S. launched today! A total of fifty-eight artworks will pop up through the month of August on 50,000 displays nationwide, including static and digital billboards, subway platforms and trains, buses and bus shelters. Keep your eyes peeled! 

  3. lacma:

What if billboards advertised art instead of stuff you don’t need? http://bit.ly/1rdYRVF via Fast Company ‪

“I have this image of driving on Route 66 in a convertible and seeing a Georgia O’Keeffe billboard.” —Jeff Levine, the Whitney’s chief marketing and communications officer.

    lacma:

    What if billboards advertised art instead of stuff you don’t need? http://bit.ly/1rdYRVF via Fast Company ‪

    “I have this image of driving on Route 66 in a convertible and seeing a Georgia O’Keeffe billboard.” —Jeff Levine, the Whitney’s chief marketing and communications officer.

  4. Celebrate American art! Cast your vote for the chance to see your favorite American artwork on up to 50,000 advertising displays nationwide. Polls are open through May 7, and the works chosen will be announced in June. Vote now for Art Everywhere US.

  5. Charles Burchfield painted Noontide in Late May soon after returning to Ohio from a brief and unhappy sojourn in New York City. The vivid watercolor reflects the artist’s enchantment with his own hometown. Vote now for a chance to see Burchfield’s exuberant landscape reproduced outdoors as part of Art Everywhere US! 
Charles Burchfield (1893–1967), Noontide in Late May, 1917. Watercolor, gouache, and graphite on paper. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase 31.408. All works by Charles Burchfield are reproduced with permission of the Charles E. Burchfield Foundation

    Charles Burchfield painted Noontide in Late May soon after returning to Ohio from a brief and unhappy sojourn in New York City. The vivid watercolor reflects the artist’s enchantment with his own hometown. 

    Vote now for a chance to see Burchfield’s exuberant landscape reproduced outdoors as part of Art Everywhere US

    Charles Burchfield (1893–1967), Noontide in Late May, 1917. Watercolor, gouache, and graphite on paper. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase 31.408. All works by Charles Burchfield are reproduced with permission of the Charles E. Burchfield Foundation

  6. The 2014 Biennial is on view through May 25. See it today at the Whitney, or everywhere else tomorrow. 

    The 2014 Biennial is on view through May 25. See it today at the Whitney, or everywhere else tomorrow. 

  7. Last chance! Edward Steichen in the 1920s and 1930s: A Recent Acquisition closes Sunday.

  8. Edward Steichen in the 1920s and 1930s: A Recent Acquisition is on view through February 23. Don’t miss it! 
blakegopnik:

DAILY PIC: The great photographer Edward Steichen did this product shot for Gorham Silver in 1929, and it’s now in the show of early Steichens recently acquired by the Whitney Museum in New York. The modest image has a wonderful modernist clarity and rigor. More than that, though, it gives visual confirmation of a general sense we have that modernist style in art was built on a scaffolding of modern forms of industry and commerce.  (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, gift of Richard and Jackie Hollander in memory of Ellyn Hollander; © 2014 The Estate of Edward Steichen /  Artists Rights Society (ARS), N.Y.)

    Edward Steichen in the 1920s and 1930s: A Recent Acquisition is on view through February 23. Don’t miss it! 

    blakegopnik:

    DAILY PIC: The great photographer Edward Steichen did this product shot for Gorham Silver in 1929, and it’s now in the show of early Steichens recently acquired by the Whitney Museum in New York. The modest image has a wonderful modernist clarity and rigor. More than that, though, it gives visual confirmation of a general sense we have that modernist style in art was built on a scaffolding of modern forms of industry and commerce.  (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, gift of Richard and Jackie Hollander in memory of Ellyn Hollander; © 2014 The Estate of Edward Steichen /  Artists Rights Society (ARS), N.Y.)

  9. Photography records the gamut of feelings written on the human face; the beauty of the earth and skies that man has inherited; and the wealth and confusion man has created. It is a major force in explaining man to man.

    — Edward Steichen, whose work is on view in Edward Steichen in the 1920s and 1930s: A Recent Acquisition through February 23.

  10. Hope everyone has fun ushering in the New Year tonight! 
Edward Steichen (1879–1973), Ad for Coty Lipstick, c. 1930. Gelatin silver print, sheet: 9 15/16 × 7 15/16 in. (25.2 × 20.2 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Richard and Jackie Hollander in memory of Ellyn Hollander 2012.205. © Permission of the Estate of Edward Steichen

    Hope everyone has fun ushering in the New Year tonight! 

    Edward Steichen (1879–1973), Ad for Coty Lipstick, c. 1930. Gelatin silver print, sheet: 9 15/16 × 7 15/16 in. (25.2 × 20.2 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Richard and Jackie Hollander in memory of Ellyn Hollander 2012.205. © Permission of the Estate of Edward Steichen

  11. OPEN TODAY! Edward Steichen in the 1920s and 1930s: A Recent Acquisition features more than forty celebrity portraits and fashion photographs taken for Vanity Fair and Vogue, shots for advertising campaigns, and images that reflect Steichen’s interest in the natural world.
Edward Steichen (1879–1973), Paul Robeson (as Brutus Jones in The Emperor Jones, for Vanity Fair), 1933. Gelatin silver print, mounted on board, 9 15/16 × 8in. (25.2 × 20.3 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art; gift of Richard and Jackie Hollander in memory of Ellyn Hollander 2012.240

    OPEN TODAY! Edward Steichen in the 1920s and 1930s: A Recent Acquisition features more than forty celebrity portraits and fashion photographs taken for Vanity Fair and Vogue, shots for advertising campaigns, and images that reflect Steichen’s interest in the natural world.

    Edward Steichen (1879–1973), Paul Robeson (as Brutus Jones in The Emperor Jones, for Vanity Fair), 1933. Gelatin silver print, mounted on board, 9 15/16 × 8in. (25.2 × 20.3 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art; gift of Richard and Jackie Hollander in memory of Ellyn Hollander 2012.240

  12. It’s easy to forget the gritty NYC subway system of the ’70s and ’80s. In 1981, artist Les Levine developed a subway poster “campaign” daring passengers to challenge the negativity of the immediate social environment. See it now in I, YOU, WE.
Les Levine (b. 1935), We Are Not Afraid, 1981. Color offset process, Sheet: 22 × 21 1/8 in. (55.9 × 53.7 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Carolina Nitsch, in honor of David Kiehl 2009.66. © Les Levine for The Museum of Mott Art, Inc. 1981

    It’s easy to forget the gritty NYC subway system of the ’70s and ’80s. In 1981, artist Les Levine developed a subway poster “campaign” daring passengers to challenge the negativity of the immediate social environment. See it now in I, YOU, WE.

    Les Levine (b. 1935), We Are Not Afraid, 1981. Color offset process, Sheet: 22 × 21 1/8 in. (55.9 × 53.7 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Carolina Nitsch, in honor of David Kiehl 2009.66. © Les Levine for The Museum of Mott Art, Inc. 1981

  13. Catch our ad the next time you’re waiting to catch your train! Blues for Smoke is on view through April 28.

    Catch our ad the next time you’re waiting to catch your train! Blues for Smoke is on view through April 28.

  14. Yayoi Kusama bus stop advertisement. Love this shot! 

    Yayoi Kusama bus stop advertisement. Love this shot!