1. While Marcel Breuer might have needed a map to Alexander Calder's home in 1947, we doubt he'd need one to see the artist's work currently on view at the Museum!
archivesofamericanart:

Wait, wasn’t this posted just a few days ago? No, my friends, this is not the map drawn by Alexander Calder to direct Ben Shahn to his house, it’s the map drawn by Alexander Calder to direct Marcel Breuer to his house. I wonder how many more of these are tucked away in our various collections?
Alexander Calder to Marcel Breuer, 1947 Apr. 2. Marcel Breuer papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

    While Marcel Breuer might have needed a map to Alexander Calder's home in 1947, we doubt he'd need one to see the artist's work currently on view at the Museum!

    archivesofamericanart:

    Wait, wasn’t this posted just a few days ago? No, my friends, this is not the map drawn by Alexander Calder to direct Ben Shahn to his house, it’s the map drawn by Alexander Calder to direct Marcel Breuer to his house. I wonder how many more of these are tucked away in our various collections?

    Alexander Calder to Marcel Breuer, 1947 Apr. 2. Marcel Breuer papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

  2. Watch Whitney conservators Carol Mancusi-Ungaro and Eleonora Nagy, archivist Anita Duquette, and art historian Joan Simon describe the process of restoring one of the most beloved works in the Museum’s collection, Alexander Calder’s Circus.

    Calder’s Circus is on view now in American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe.

  3. American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe showcases the Whitney’s deep holdings of artwork from the first half of the twentieth century by the eighteen leading artists including Oscar Bluemner, Charles Burchfield, Paul Cadmus, and Alexander Calder. Enjoy these select installation shots and come see the exhibition in person! On view now. 

  4. With Calder's The Cock’s Comb (1960) looking on, KOOL A.D., Amaze 88, and Loren Hell took the stage in the Museum’s lower gallery last night. The music continues through the weekend, as young artists present their contemporary spin on the blues tradition.

    With Calder's The Cock’s Comb (1960) looking on, KOOL A.D., Amaze 88, and Loren Hell took the stage in the Museum’s lower gallery last night. The music continues through the weekend, as young artists present their contemporary spin on the blues tradition.

  5. American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe opens today. Each gallery on the Museum’s fifth-floor will be devoted to presentations of the leading artists of the first half of the twentieth century, providing an in-depth look at the beloved work of Edward Hopper, Stuart Davis, and other icons of the Whitney’s collection.
Charles Demuth (1883–1935), My Egypt, 1927. Oil on fiberboard, 35 3/4 × 30 in. (90.8 × 76.2 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase with funds from Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney   31.172

    American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe opens today. Each gallery on the Museum’s fifth-floor will be devoted to presentations of the leading artists of the first half of the twentieth century, providing an in-depth look at the beloved work of Edward Hopper, Stuart Davis, and other icons of the Whitney’s collection.

    Charles Demuth (1883–1935), My Egypt, 1927. Oil on fiberboard, 35 3/4 × 30 in. (90.8 × 76.2 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase with funds from Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney   31.172

  6. An entire gallery will be devoted to the work of Alexander Calder in American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe, opening December 22.
archivesofamericanart:

Artists: They’re Just Like Us!
They chat on the phone!
Alexander Calder, 1956 / Foto Mercurio, photographer. Alexander Calder papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

    An entire gallery will be devoted to the work of Alexander Calder in American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe, opening December 22.

    archivesofamericanart:

    Artists: They’re Just Like Us!

    They chat on the phone!

    Alexander Calder, 1956 / Foto Mercurio, photographer. Alexander Calder papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

  7. Opening December 22, American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe will feature works by eighteen leading artists from the first half of the twentieth century. Individual galleries will be devoted to Edward Hopper, Stuart Davis, Jacob Lawrence, and others at the core of the Museum’s collection.
Joseph Stella (1877–1946), The Brooklyn Bridge: Variation on an Old Theme, 1939. Oil on canvas, 70 × 42 in. (177.8 × 106.7 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase 42.15

    Opening December 22, American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe will feature works by eighteen leading artists from the first half of the twentieth century. Individual galleries will be devoted to Edward Hopper, Stuart Davis, Jacob Lawrence, and others at the core of the Museum’s collection.

    Joseph Stella (1877–1946), The Brooklyn Bridge: Variation on an Old Theme, 1939. Oil on canvas, 70 × 42 in. (177.8 × 106.7 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase 42.15