1. The good thing about being an artist, is it’s a legitimate way of looking at things cross-eyed.

    — John Chamberlain, born today in 1927.

  2. From Marsden Hartley to Cindy Sherman, there’s something for everyone in Art Everywhere USCast your vote now and tell us which iconic American artworks you want to see on billboards, trains, and buses across the country—including twenty from the Whitney’s permanent collection.

  3. During the nearly fifteen years that Vincent Punch has been a guard at the Whitney, he has seen myriad exhibitions, snapped countless candid photos, and developed a distinct eye for spontaneous visual arrangements that take place every day in the galleries. In this Whitney Stories video, he shares his observations on working as a guard, and offers his unique perspective on the Whitney and its future.

  4. Happy first day of spring!
Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Le Pavillon de Flore in the Spring, 1907. Oil on canvas. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest. © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by Whitney Museum of American Art

    Happy first day of spring!

    Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Le Pavillon de Flore in the Spring, 1907. Oil on canvas. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest. © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by Whitney Museum of American Art

  5. With film, it’s hard to locate the artwork: Is it the projected image? The projection beam? The room in which it’s being projected? It’s a constellation of things rather than a singular object. I think that’s a metaphor for how a lot of artists working in a broad range of media function now.

    — Stuart Comer, one of the three curators of the 2014 BiennialIn the second installment of a three-part Q&A in Whitney Stories, Comer, Michelle Grabner, and Anthony Elms discuss their curatorial approaches as each organizes a floor of the exhibition.

  6. The 2014 Biennial catalogue is now available! Pick one up at the Museum Shop.

    The 2014 Biennial catalogue is now available! Pick one up at the Museum Shop.

  7. As the Whitney prepares for its historic move downtown, Flora Miller Biddle discusses the three generations of “Whitney Women”—her grandmother Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, who in 1914 founded the Whitney Studio in Greenwich Village, and in 1930 the Whitney Museum of American Art; her mother Flora Whitney Miller, who served as the Museum’s President (1941–1966) and Chairman (1966–1974); and herself, who served as President (1977–1985) and is currently the Honorary Chairman of the Museum.

  8. The New York Times previews the 2014 Biennial, highlighting some of the themes—nostalgia, women revitalizing abstract painting, architecture, and more—that figure prominently in the seventy-seventh edition of the Museum’s signature exhibition.
Laura Owens (b. 1970), Untitled, 2013 (detail). Oil, Flashe, acrylic, bike wheels, training wheels, wagon wheels, and tricycle wheel on linen, 108 × 84 in. (274.3 × 213.4 cm), Private collection; courtesy the artist and Gavin Brown’s enterprise, New York. Photograph by Tom Powel

    The New York Times previews the 2014 Biennial, highlighting some of the themes—nostalgia, women revitalizing abstract painting, architecture, and more—that figure prominently in the seventy-seventh edition of the Museum’s signature exhibition.

    Laura Owens (b. 1970), Untitled, 2013 (detail). Oil, Flashe, acrylic, bike wheels, training wheels, wagon wheels, and tricycle wheel on linen, 108 × 84 in. (274.3 × 213.4 cm), Private collection; courtesy the artist and Gavin Brown’s enterprise, New York. Photograph by Tom Powel

  9. Artists Emily Sundblad and Sara Greenberger Rafferty posed in front of the Museum’s iconic windows for the latest issue of New York Magazine. See their work when the Biennial opens March 7.

    Artists Emily Sundblad and Sara Greenberger Rafferty posed in front of the Museum’s iconic windows for the latest issue of New York Magazine. See their work when the Biennial opens March 7.

  10. Burgoyne Diller is one of the new artists featured in the latest installation of American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe, which showcases the Whitney’s holdings of artwork from the first half of the twentieth century alongside that of postwar figures. 

    Burgoyne Diller is one of the new artists featured in the latest installation of American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe, which showcases the Whitney’s holdings of artwork from the first half of the twentieth century alongside that of postwar figures. 

  11. New on Whitney Stories: We talk to curator Dana Miller, who coordinated the loan of two of our Edward Hopper paintings to the The White House.

  12. Don’t miss Edward Steichen in the 1920s and 1930s: A Recent Acquisition, on view through Sunday. The exhibition features more than forty works by the “godfather of modern fashion photography” (Gotham).

  13. Anything I can do to put more artists in more people’s faces is something I’ll say yes to.

    — Anthony Elms, one of the three curators of the 2014 Biennial, talks to The New York Times.

  14. Architect Renzo Piano designed the Whitney’s future home, which will open to the public in 2015. In this Whitney Stories video, Piano articulates the philosophy behind the building’s design and describes the experiences envisioned for its spaces—from its expansive galleries to its city-facing terraces.

  15. People should fall in love with their eyes closed. Just close your eyes. Don’t look.

    — Andy Warhol in The Philosophy of Andy Warhol: From A to B and Back Again.