1. People should fall in love with their eyes closed. Just close your eyes. Don’t look.

    — Andy Warhol in The Philosophy of Andy Warhol: From A to B and Back Again.

  2. Vito Acconci, Security Zone, 1971 from Whitney Museum of American Art on Vimeo.

    Happy birthday to Vito Acconci, born today in 1940. In this video, Acconci discusses his performance project Security Zone (1971), which took place at New York City’s Pier 18, near the site of the future Whitney.

    See Acconci’s work in Rituals of Rented Island: Object Theater, Loft Performance, and the New Psychodrama—Manhattan, 1970–1980 through February 2.

  3. "One of the most mesmerizing temporary sights in town…not to be missed and maybe never to be forgotten." —New York Magazine on T. J. Wilcox: In the Air, on view through February 9. 
Installation view of T. J. Wilcox: In the Air, 2013 (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, September 19, 2013–February 9, 2014). Photograph by Bill Orcutt

    "One of the most mesmerizing temporary sights in town…not to be missed and maybe never to be forgotten." —New York Magazine on T. J. Wilcox: In the Air, on view through February 9. 

    Installation view of T. J. Wilcox: In the Air, 2013 (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, September 19, 2013–February 9, 2014). Photograph by Bill Orcutt

  4. This Saturday we’re opening early—just for families! Parents and kids of all ages are invited to explore Hopper Drawing through tours, workshops, and a collaborative drawing project led by artist Jason Polan. To learn more about Hopper Drawing Family Day, visit whitney.org.
Photograph by Filip Wolak

    This Saturday we’re opening early—just for families! Parents and kids of all ages are invited to explore Hopper Drawing through tours, workshops, and a collaborative drawing project led by artist Jason Polan. To learn more about Hopper Drawing Family Day, visit whitney.org.

    Photograph by Filip Wolak

  5. Join us Thursday for a screening of Hopper’s Silence, a film by one of Edward Hopper’s few lifelong friends, artist and author Brian O’Doherty. O’Doherty will screen the documentary and discuss its origin: a rare TV interview he secured with the mysterious artist. 
Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Study for New York Movie, 1938 or 1939. Fabricated chalk on paper, 8 3/8 × 10 15/16 in. (21.3 × 27.8 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest 70.100. © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by the Whitney Museum of American Art. Digital image © Whitney Museum of American Art

    Join us Thursday for a screening of Hopper’s Silence, a film by one of Edward Hopper’s few lifelong friends, artist and author Brian O’Doherty. O’Doherty will screen the documentary and discuss its origin: a rare TV interview he secured with the mysterious artist. 

    Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Study for New York Movie, 1938 or 1939. Fabricated chalk on paper, 8 3/8 × 10 15/16 in. (21.3 × 27.8 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest 70.100. © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by the Whitney Museum of American Art. Digital image © Whitney Museum of American Art

  6. You only have a few more weeks to see Edward Hopper’s beloved masterpieces alongside over 200 drawings that inspired them. Hopper Drawing is on view through October 6.
Installation view of Hopper Drawing (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, May 23–October 6, 2013). Photograph by Sheldan C. Collins

    You only have a few more weeks to see Edward Hopper’s beloved masterpieces alongside over 200 drawings that inspired them. Hopper Drawing is on view through October 6.

    Installation view of Hopper Drawing (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, May 23–October 6, 2013). Photograph by Sheldan C. Collins

  7. News from the Press Office: The first major American museum retrospective devoted to the work of Robert Indiana is opening at the Whitney on September 26.
Robert Indiana (b. 1928), EAT/DIE, 1962. Oil on canvas, 2 panels, 72 × 60 in. (182.9 × 152.4 cm) each. Private Collection. © 2013 Morgan Art Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

    News from the Press Office: The first major American museum retrospective devoted to the work of Robert Indiana is opening at the Whitney on September 26.

    Robert Indiana (b. 1928), EAT/DIE, 1962. Oil on canvas, 2 panels, 72 × 60 in. (182.9 × 152.4 cm) each. Private Collection. © 2013 Morgan Art Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

  8. Art … should be something that liberates the soul, provokes the imagination, and encourages people to go further.

    Keith Haring, born today in 1958. Haring’s Altar Piece (1990) is on view now in I, YOU, WE.

  9. Artists tour the Whitney’s new building site in downtown Manhattan, which will open in 2015. 
From left to right: Whitney chief curator and deputy director for programs Donna De Salvo, Christo, Mark di Suvero, Hendel Teicher, Terry Winters, Jim Hodges, Frank Stella, Barbara Kruger, director Adam D. Weinberg, Lawrence Weiner, curator Carter Foster, Pat Steir, Marilyn Minter, Joost Elffers, T.J. Wilcox, Lauren Wolchik, and Harriet Stella.

    Artists tour the Whitney’s new building site in downtown Manhattan, which will open in 2015. 

    From left to right: Whitney chief curator and deputy director for programs Donna De Salvo, Christo, Mark di Suvero, Hendel Teicher, Terry Winters, Jim Hodges, Frank Stella, Barbara Kruger, director Adam D. Weinberg, Lawrence Weiner, curator Carter Foster, Pat Steir, Marilyn Minter, Joost Elffers, T.J. Wilcox, Lauren Wolchik, and Harriet Stella.

  10. Jay DeFeo was born today in 1929. Explore the full breadth of her work in Jay DeFeo: A Retrospective, on view through June 2.DeFeo in Colorado, c. 1929 (top), and in California, c. 1932 (bottom). Photographs paired and printed by DeFeo in 1973. © 2013 The Jay DeFeo Trust/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

    Jay DeFeo was born today in 1929. Explore the full breadth of her work in Jay DeFeo: A Retrospective, on view through June 2.

    DeFeo in Colorado, c. 1929 (top), and in California, c. 1932 (bottom). Photographs paired and printed by DeFeo in 1973. © 2013 The Jay DeFeo Trust/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

  11. Tell Him I have eyes only for Heaven / as I look to you / Queen mirror / of the heavenly court.

    Jay DeFeo inscribed the back of her painting The Eyes with this stanza from a contemporaneous poem by Philip Lamantia. The artist used the first line as the full title of the work for several years before it became known simply as The Eyes.

  12. The Jay DeFeo: A Retrospective exhibition catalogue—the first comprehensive monograph of her work—is available at the Whitney Shop. The book was recently featured in The New York Times. 

    The Jay DeFeo: A Retrospective exhibition catalogue—the first comprehensive monograph of her work—is available at the Whitney Shop. The book was recently featured in The New York Times

  13. In conjunction with his event SYNONYM FOR UNTITLED, artist Andrew Lampert designed a limited-edition set of seven postcards featuring photographs taken behind the scenes at the Whitney. To purchase, visit the Museum Shop while supplies last.

  14. This Friday, experience an immersive evening of live performance and culinary invention at SYNONYM FOR UNTITLED. Untitled chef Chris Bradley will prepare a tasting menu based on a grocery list created by artist Andrew Lampert, which makes associative pairings between artists in the Whitney’s collection and culinary ingredients. The evening will also feature contributions from poet Mónica de la Torre, cellist Okkyung Lee, and violinist C. Spencer Yeh. Visit whitney.org for more information. 

    This Friday, experience an immersive evening of live performance and culinary invention at SYNONYM FOR UNTITLED. Untitled chef Chris Bradley will prepare a tasting menu based on a grocery list created by artist Andrew Lampert, which makes associative pairings between artists in the Whitney’s collection and culinary ingredients. The evening will also feature contributions from poet Mónica de la Torre, cellist Okkyung Lee, and violinist C. Spencer Yeh. Visit whitney.org for more information. 

  15. We’re thrilled to introduce the latest iteration of Sunrise/Sunset, launching this evening. goodmorning goodnight  by JODI explores visual and textual representations of the sun’s trajectory in an online environment. The project premieres tonight at 5:52 pm (EST) on whitney.org.

    Overlaid on a grid of latitudes and longitudes of the area surrounding the Whitney Museum are location-specific images of sunsets and sunrises culled from Panoramino, a photo sharing website. Viewers can follow the sun’s visual path in different locations around Manhattan superimposed with text via livedash.

    JODI (Joan Heemskerk and Dirk Paesmans), or Jodi.org, started pioneering Web art in 1994. Based in the Netherlands, they were among the first artists to investigate and subvert conventions of the internet, computer programs, and video and computer games.