1. The good thing about being an artist, is it’s a legitimate way of looking at things cross-eyed.

    — John Chamberlain, born today in 1927.

  2. “Bronze is a kind of beautiful alchemical wizardry.” —2014 Biennial artist Ricky Swallow

    “Bronze is a kind of beautiful alchemical wizardry.” —2014 Biennial artist Ricky Swallow

  3. Tickets for our annual Art Party on May 8 are on sale now! Proceeds support the Whitney’s Independent Study Program and other education initiatives.

    Tickets for our annual Art Party on May 8 are on sale now! Proceeds support the Whitney’s Independent Study Program and other education initiatives.

  4. A look at the third floor of the 2014 Biennial, curated by Stuart Comer.

  5. As part of the Biennial, Miguel Gutierrez will perform a duet with young dancer Mickey Mahar entitled Age & Beauty Part 1: Mid-Career Artist/Suicide Note or &:-/. The piece deals with mid-career anxiety, futurity, and tropes about the aging gay choreographer, and is the first of a three-part series of queer pieces addressing longevity, sustainability, aesthetic signature, and burnout. Get tickets.

  6. 2014 Biennial artist Fred Lonidier speaks about his work detailing labor issues in light assembly plants in Tijuana. Londier will be leading a Teach-In this Friday evening that considers the connection between art production and the regulation of labor.

  7. From Marsden Hartley to Cindy Sherman, there’s something for everyone in Art Everywhere USCast your vote now and tell us which iconic American artworks you want to see on billboards, trains, and buses across the country—including twenty from the Whitney’s permanent collection.

  8. For over four decades, Channa Horwitz produced works using a rigid formal vocabulary of her devising, built on a standardized grid and a system of notations based on the numbers 1 through 8, each assigned its own color. Horwitz developed the system as a way of marking and expressing time, movement, and rhythm.

    For over four decades, Channa Horwitz produced works using a rigid formal vocabulary of her devising, built on a standardized grid and a system of notations based on the numbers 1 through 8, each assigned its own color. Horwitz developed the system as a way of marking and expressing time, movement, and rhythm.

  9. A look at the second floor of the 2014 Biennial, curated by Anthony Elms. 

  10. This week, Academy Records presents two works running simultaneously in the Film and Video Gallery. The Bower, a film loop of blossoming cherry trees, plays continuously over the three-hour audio work No Jets, a field recording of the flight path to Chicago’s O’Hare airport during the flight delay after the September 11, 2001 attacks.
Academy Records, still from The Bower, 2011-13. 16mm film, color, silent; approx. 1:30 minutes, looped. Collection of the artist. Courtesy the artist. © Stephen Lacy

    This week, Academy Records presents two works running simultaneously in the Film and Video Gallery. The Bower, a film loop of blossoming cherry trees, plays continuously over the three-hour audio work No Jets, a field recording of the flight path to Chicago’s O’Hare airport during the flight delay after the September 11, 2001 attacks.

    Academy Records, still from The Bower, 2011-13. 16mm film, color, silent; approx. 1:30 minutes, looped. Collection of the artist. Courtesy the artist. © Stephen Lacy

  11. This Saturday, bring your kids to celebrate what’s happening now in contemporary art at our 2014 Biennial Family Party. Families will participate in interactive tours, gallery activities, and an art workshop. 
Keith Mayerson (b. 1966), My Family, 2013. Oil on linen, 56 × 70 in. © Keith Mayerson; courtesy the artist and Derek Eller Gallery, NY. Photograph by Tom Powel Imaging

    This Saturday, bring your kids to celebrate what’s happening now in contemporary art at our 2014 Biennial Family Party. Families will participate in interactive tours, gallery activities, and an art workshop. 

    Keith Mayerson (b. 1966), My Family, 2013. Oil on linen, 56 × 70 in. © Keith Mayerson; courtesy the artist and Derek Eller Gallery, NY. Photograph by Tom Powel Imaging

  12. For the first Biennial, artists—among them Grant Wood, Arshile Gorky, and Georgia O’Keeffe—were invited to submit works of their own choosing, continuing the tradition of nonjuried exhibitions surveying new American art which began at the Whitney Studio Club in 1918.
Installation view of the First Biennial Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting, November 23, 1932–January 5, 1933, Whitney Museum of American Art

    For the first Biennial, artists—among them Grant Wood, Arshile Gorky, and Georgia O’Keeffe—were invited to submit works of their own choosing, continuing the tradition of nonjuried exhibitions surveying new American art which began at the Whitney Studio Club in 1918.

    Installation view of the First Biennial Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting, November 23, 1932–January 5, 1933, Whitney Museum of American Art

  13. “When in doubt, spray paint it gold.” —Rebecca Morris in her manifesto, For Abstractionists and Friends of the Non-Objective, a tongue-in-cheek yet absolutely sincere call to arms for practitioners of the form. See her work on the second floor of the Biennial.

    “When in doubt, spray paint it gold.” —Rebecca Morris in her manifesto, For Abstractionists and Friends of the Non-Objective, a tongue-in-cheek yet absolutely sincere call to arms for practitioners of the form. See her work on the second floor of the Biennial.

  14. Susan Howe’s poems on view in the 2014 Biennial draw on a wide variety of texts, spanning American, British, and Irish poetry and folklore as well as critical and art historical sources. She cuts out sentences and fragments of pages, pasting and taping them to create a new text that retains the typefaces, spacing, and rhythms of the originals. These compositions are then made into letterpress prints.
Susan Howe, Untitled (from Tom Tit Tot), 2013. Letterpress print, 12 × 9 in. (30.5 × 22.9 cm). Collection of the artist. © Susan Howe

    Susan Howe’s poems on view in the 2014 Biennial draw on a wide variety of texts, spanning American, British, and Irish poetry and folklore as well as critical and art historical sources. She cuts out sentences and fragments of pages, pasting and taping them to create a new text that retains the typefaces, spacing, and rhythms of the originals. These compositions are then made into letterpress prints.

    Susan Howe, Untitled (from Tom Tit Tot), 2013. Letterpress print, 12 × 9 in. (30.5 × 22.9 cm). Collection of the artist. © Susan Howe

  15. During the nearly fifteen years that Vincent Punch has been a guard at the Whitney, he has seen myriad exhibitions, snapped countless candid photos, and developed a distinct eye for spontaneous visual arrangements that take place every day in the galleries. In this Whitney Stories video, he shares his observations on working as a guard, and offers his unique perspective on the Whitney and its future.