1. "When color becomes material, I’m really interested in that … When you put a bunch of string into a mess of paint, and the string takes on the color, the canvas also takes the color in unpredictable ways." —Dona Nelson talks about making String Beings (2013).

    Want to hear more from artists in the 2014 Biennial? Pick up a free Whitney Guide in the Lobby, a Windows Phone app featuring interviews with artists, commentary from the curators, and a tour for kids.

  2. The good thing about being an artist, is it’s a legitimate way of looking at things cross-eyed.

    — John Chamberlain, born today in 1927.

  3. “Bronze is a kind of beautiful alchemical wizardry.” —2014 Biennial artist Ricky Swallow

    “Bronze is a kind of beautiful alchemical wizardry.” —2014 Biennial artist Ricky Swallow

  4. Exploring the 2014 Biennial this weekend? Pick up a free Whitney Guide in the Lobby, a Windows Phone app created exclusively for the Biennial featuring interviews with artists, commentary from the curators, and a tour for kids.

    Exploring the 2014 Biennial this weekend? Pick up a free Whitney Guide in the Lobby, a Windows Phone app created exclusively for the Biennial featuring interviews with artists, commentary from the curators, and a tour for kids.

  5. Happy first day of spring!
Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Le Pavillon de Flore in the Spring, 1907. Oil on canvas. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest. © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by Whitney Museum of American Art

    Happy first day of spring!

    Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Le Pavillon de Flore in the Spring, 1907. Oil on canvas. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest. © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by Whitney Museum of American Art

  6. We don’t always realize that what we see…we also feel.

    — Biennial artist John Mason discusses ways of looking at sculpture and how he became an artist.

  7. blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC, Whitney Biennial edition:  Biennial artist Paul Druecke collaborated with poet Donna Stonecipher  on this wall work, which sits by the little bridge that links the Whitney Museum to the rest of New York. It captures the language of commemorative plaques that we place here and there across most of our cities, as we testify to the histories that we live among and that risk being lost to us. (I recognize the “falconer” line from the plaque on a Victorian statue that I jog by in Central Park, and the “somber, heavy, and even brutal” passage is boilerplate that refers to the Whitney itself.) By providing a mash-up of so many separate commemorations, Druecke and Stonecipher distill out a poignant, generalized sense of our efforts to preserve memories. When we put up any plaque, they seem to be saying, the act of erecting it matters as much as the information it bears. This Whitney work, you could say, is a plaque that commemorates all our other plaques. (Photo by Lucy Hogg)
The Daily Pic also appears at blogs.artinfo.com/the-daily-pic. For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.

    blakegopnik:

    THE DAILY PIC, Whitney Biennial edition:  Biennial artist Paul Druecke collaborated with poet Donna Stonecipher  on this wall work, which sits by the little bridge that links the Whitney Museum to the rest of New York. It captures the language of commemorative plaques that we place here and there across most of our cities, as we testify to the histories that we live among and that risk being lost to us. (I recognize the “falconer” line from the plaque on a Victorian statue that I jog by in Central Park, and the “somber, heavy, and even brutal” passage is boilerplate that refers to the Whitney itself.) By providing a mash-up of so many separate commemorations, Druecke and Stonecipher distill out a poignant, generalized sense of our efforts to preserve memories. When we put up any plaque, they seem to be saying, the act of erecting it matters as much as the information it bears. This Whitney work, you could say, is a plaque that commemorates all our other plaques. (Photo by Lucy Hogg)

    The Daily Pic also appears at blogs.artinfo.com/the-daily-pic. For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.

  8. #AmericanArtIs an ongoing conversation. The 2014 Biennial is up for debate. Love it? Hate it? Have your say. 

    #AmericanArtIs an ongoing conversation. The 2014 Biennial is up for debate. Love it? Hate it? Have your say. 

  9. 2014 Biennial artists Zackary Drucker and Rhys Ernst visit the apartment of drag performance icon Flawless Sabrina, who features in Drucker and Ernst’s video She Gone Rogue. Flawless Sabrina performs a tarot reading for Drucker and the two discuss the pitfalls of success. 

    As part of the Biennial, Flawless Sabrina will hold tarot card readings at her apartment the weeks of March 24–April 13. Visit the project’s ticketing site to schedule an appointment.

  10. Next Wednesday, Biennial artist Zoe Leonard invites visitors to take part in a seminar in her installation on the fourth floor. This lecture will engage Leonard’s interest in the act of looking as not only an optical process, but as a temporal, spatial, and social experience. Register online.
Zoe Leonard, 945 Madison Avenue, 2014 (installation view, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York). Collection of the artist; courtesy Murray Guy, New York; Galleria Raffaella Cortese, Milan; and Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne

    Next Wednesday, Biennial artist Zoe Leonard invites visitors to take part in a seminar in her installation on the fourth floor. This lecture will engage Leonard’s interest in the act of looking as not only an optical process, but as a temporal, spatial, and social experience. Register online.

    Zoe Leonard, 945 Madison Avenue, 2014 (installation view, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York). Collection of the artist; courtesy Murray Guy, New York; Galleria Raffaella Cortese, Milan; and Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne

  11. #AmericanArtIs UP FOR DEBATE. The 2014 Biennial is on view now. See it today and tell us what you think. 

    #AmericanArtIs UP FOR DEBATE. The 2014 Biennial is on view now. See it today and tell us what you think. 

  12. The 2014 Biennial catalogue is now available! Pick one up at the Museum Shop.

    The 2014 Biennial catalogue is now available! Pick one up at the Museum Shop.

  13. The New York Times previews the 2014 Biennial, highlighting some of the themes—nostalgia, women revitalizing abstract painting, architecture, and more—that figure prominently in the seventy-seventh edition of the Museum’s signature exhibition.
Laura Owens (b. 1970), Untitled, 2013 (detail). Oil, Flashe, acrylic, bike wheels, training wheels, wagon wheels, and tricycle wheel on linen, 108 × 84 in. (274.3 × 213.4 cm), Private collection; courtesy the artist and Gavin Brown’s enterprise, New York. Photograph by Tom Powel

    The New York Times previews the 2014 Biennial, highlighting some of the themes—nostalgia, women revitalizing abstract painting, architecture, and more—that figure prominently in the seventy-seventh edition of the Museum’s signature exhibition.

    Laura Owens (b. 1970), Untitled, 2013 (detail). Oil, Flashe, acrylic, bike wheels, training wheels, wagon wheels, and tricycle wheel on linen, 108 × 84 in. (274.3 × 213.4 cm), Private collection; courtesy the artist and Gavin Brown’s enterprise, New York. Photograph by Tom Powel

  14. Artists Emily Sundblad and Sara Greenberger Rafferty posed in front of the Museum’s iconic windows for the latest issue of New York Magazine. See their work when the Biennial opens March 7.

    Artists Emily Sundblad and Sara Greenberger Rafferty posed in front of the Museum’s iconic windows for the latest issue of New York Magazine. See their work when the Biennial opens March 7.

  15. Anything I can do to put more artists in more people’s faces is something I’ll say yes to.

    — Anthony Elms, one of the three curators of the 2014 Biennial, talks to The New York Times.