1. What an artist is trying to do for people is to bring them closer to something, because art is about sharing: you wouldn’t be an artist unless you wanted to share an experience, a thought.

    — David Hockney, born today in 1937.

  2. jewelzafra:

Inflatable Flower by Jeff Koons

“The inflatables are really where I think my history as an artist begins.” —Jeff Koons

    jewelzafra:

    Inflatable Flower by Jeff Koons

    “The inflatables are really where I think my history as an artist begins.” —Jeff Koons

  3. "My work isn’t about form. It’s about seeing. I’m excited about seeing things and I’m interested in the way I think other people saw things." —Roy Lichtenstein
See his work in American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe through Sunday.

    "My work isn’t about form. It’s about seeing. I’m excited about seeing things and I’m interested in the way I think other people saw things." —Roy Lichtenstein

    See his work in American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe through Sunday.

  4. "What inspires me is feeling. I’m talking about a sense of excitement, of awe and wonder. As a child, you have a kind of openness." —Jeff Koons to Art in America.
Jeff Koons (b. 1955), Bear and Policeman, 1988. Polychromed wood; 85 × 43 × 37 in. (215.9 × 109.2 × 94 cm). Artist’s proof. Collection of Jeffrey Deitch. © Jeff Koons

    "What inspires me is feeling. I’m talking about a sense of excitement, of awe and wonder. As a child, you have a kind of openness." —Jeff Koons to Art in America.

    Jeff Koons (b. 1955), Bear and Policeman, 1988. Polychromed wood; 85 × 43 × 37 in. (215.9 × 109.2 × 94 cm). Artist’s proof. Collection of Jeffrey Deitch. © Jeff Koons

  5. Actual space is intrinsically more powerful and specific than paint on a flat surface.

    — Donald Judd, born today in 1928.

  6. jayzslifeandtimes:

Whitney Museum Presents: “Jeff Koons: A Retrospective” http://bit.ly/1lP2oBk

Our Jeff Koons retrospective opens a month from today!  

    jayzslifeandtimes:

    Whitney Museum Presents: “Jeff Koons: A Retrospective” http://bit.ly/1lP2oBk

    Our Jeff Koons retrospective opens a month from today!  

  7. "For our system of government to work, there has to be that sway there. Otherwise we’re doomed. We have to question: maybe it’s this way; maybe it’s that way; probably it’s a bit of both. There’s some good in all bad. There’s some bad in all good." —Flawless Sabrina

    New on Whitney Stories: Flawless Sabrina, Biennial artist Zackary Drucker, and senior curatorial assistant Elisabeth Sherman discuss tarot card readings; the first drag contest Flawless Sabrina initiated in 1959; and the ever-changing landscape of New York City. 

  8. If you’re a painter, you’re not alone. There’s no way to be alone.

    — Franz Kline, born today in 1910.

  9. Curator Scott Rothkopf and Jeff Koons visit the sculpture Play-Doh at a foundry in upstate New York. The sculpture has been in the works for over twenty years (!) and will be premiered at the Whitney in Jeff Koons: A Retrospective, opening June 27.

    Curator Scott Rothkopf and Jeff Koons visit the sculpture Play-Doh at a foundry in upstate New York. The sculpture has been in the works for over twenty years (!) and will be premiered at the Whitney in Jeff Koons: A Retrospective, opening June 27.

  10. Artist’s process: Sheila Hicks’s study for Pillar of Inquiry/Supple Column (2013–14) alongside the final work. See it in person before the 2014 Biennial closes on Sunday. 

    Artist’s process: Sheila Hicks’s study for Pillar of Inquiry/Supple Column (2013–14) alongside the final work. See it in person before the 2014 Biennial closes on Sunday. 

  11. I think making art is about bringing into being things that you want to be … If I don’t make them, I won’t see them.

    — Biennial artist Dawoud Bey.

  12. "It’s so grand, and it’s so gold, but it’s an impoverished set of materials. It’s papier mâché. It’s a cheap digital print from Staples, five dollars. It’s trying to get away with grandiosity, but it can’t quite get there." —Carol Jackson. See her work on the second floor of the Biennial. 
Carol Jackson (b. 1962), Youthful Beast, 2013. Acrylic, papier-mâché, and inkjet print. Collection of the artist

    "It’s so grand, and it’s so gold, but it’s an impoverished set of materials. It’s papier mâché. It’s a cheap digital print from Staples, five dollars. It’s trying to get away with grandiosity, but it can’t quite get there." —Carol Jackson. See her work on the second floor of the Biennial

    Carol Jackson (b. 1962), Youthful Beast, 2013. Acrylic, papier-mâché, and inkjet print. Collection of the artist

  13. On May 19, Biennial artist Dawoud Bey, along with art historian and curator Sarah Lewis and scholar Imani Perry, will reflect on the role of art and photography in the visualization and construction of race, memory, and history. Get your tickets now on whitney.org. 
Dawoud Bey (b. 1953), Maxine Adams and Amelia Maxwell (from The Birmingham Project), 2012. Two pigmented inkjet prints mounted on dibond, 40 × 64 in. (101.6 × 162.6 cm) overall. Collection of the artist. © Dawoud Bey

    On May 19, Biennial artist Dawoud Bey, along with art historian and curator Sarah Lewis and scholar Imani Perry, will reflect on the role of art and photography in the visualization and construction of race, memory, and history. Get your tickets now on whitney.org

    Dawoud Bey (b. 1953), Maxine Adams and Amelia Maxwell (from The Birmingham Project), 2012. Two pigmented inkjet prints mounted on dibond, 40 × 64 in. (101.6 × 162.6 cm) overall. Collection of the artist. © Dawoud Bey

  14. How are artworks altered through the creation of facsimiles? This Saturday, poet Caroline Bergvall, scholar Lisa Gitelman, and artist William Pope.L respond to this question, facilitated by Triple Canopy editors. Get your tickets now. 
Triple Canopy, Pointing Machines I (Chestertown, Maryland), 2013. Pigmented inkjet print, 22 1/2 × 15 in. (57.2 × 38.1 cm). Collection of Triple Canopy

    How are artworks altered through the creation of facsimiles? This Saturday, poet Caroline Bergvall, scholar Lisa Gitelman, and artist William Pope.L respond to this question, facilitated by Triple Canopy editors. Get your tickets now. 

    Triple Canopy, Pointing Machines I (Chestertown, Maryland), 2013. Pigmented inkjet print, 22 1/2 × 15 in. (57.2 × 38.1 cm). Collection of Triple Canopy

  15. "When color becomes material, I’m really interested in that … When you put a bunch of string into a mess of paint, and the string takes on the color, the canvas also takes the color in unpredictable ways." —Dona Nelson talks about making String Beings (2013).

    Want to hear more from artists in the 2014 Biennial? Pick up a free Whitney Guide in the Lobby, a Windows Phone app featuring interviews with artists, commentary from the curators, and a tour for kids.