1. I found myself with 15 years of Western painting and art history studies under my belt, but suddenly realized that my own autobiography was more important to me than the 400 years of Western painting history that I had learned. I urgently wanted to figure out a way to abandon that conceptual sphere and to find something concrete that mattered to me.

    — 2014 Biennial artist Jacolby Satterwhite (via blackcontemporaryart)

  2. A look at the fourth floor of the 2014 Biennial, curated by Michelle Grabner.

  3. Established in 2000 by longtime Whitney trustee Melva Bucksbaum and her family, the Bucksbaum Award is given every two years in recognition of an artist, chosen from those included in the Biennial, whose work demonstrates a singular combination of talent and imagination. Paul Pfeiffer was the first artist to win the prestigious prize. The 2014 Bucksbaum Award will be presented on May 21. 
Paul Pfeiffer (b. 1966), Race Riot, 2001 (installation view, Paul Pfeiffer, December 13, 2001–February 24, 2002, Whitney Museum of American Art, NY), Digital camcorder and vitrine with digital video; color, silent. Private Collection. © Paul Pfeiffer. Photography by Geoffrey Clements

    Established in 2000 by longtime Whitney trustee Melva Bucksbaum and her family, the Bucksbaum Award is given every two years in recognition of an artist, chosen from those included in the Biennial, whose work demonstrates a singular combination of talent and imagination. Paul Pfeiffer was the first artist to win the prestigious prize. The 2014 Bucksbaum Award will be presented on May 21. 

    Paul Pfeiffer (b. 1966), Race Riot, 2001 (installation view, Paul Pfeiffer, December 13, 2001–February 24, 2002, Whitney Museum of American Art, NY), Digital camcorder and vitrine with digital video; color, silent. Private Collection. © Paul Pfeiffer. Photography by Geoffrey Clements

  4. The 2014 Biennial is on view through May 25. See it today at the Whitney, or everywhere else tomorrow. 

    The 2014 Biennial is on view through May 25. See it today at the Whitney, or everywhere else tomorrow. 

  5. Shio Kusaka’s ceramic pots, bowls, and vases are “poetic, seductive vessels” says Architectural Digest. See them on the fourth floor.

    Shio Kusaka’s ceramic pots, bowls, and vases are “poetic, seductive vessels” says Architectural Digest. See them on the fourth floor.

  6. For David Diao's 40 Years of His Art, one of his paintings on view in the 2014 Biennial, the artist created a fake invitation ostensibly from the Museum of Modern Art’s Board of Trustees for a reception celebrating a fictitious Diao retrospective. The design is copied from a 1939 invitation to the Trustees’ reception for Pablo Picasso: 40 Years of His Art.
David Diao (b. 1943), 40 Years of His Art, 2013. Acrylic and vinyl on canvas, 40 × 60 in. (101.5 × 153 cm). Collection of the artist; courtesy Postmasters Gallery, New York. © David Diao

    For David Diao's 40 Years of His Art, one of his paintings on view in the 2014 Biennial, the artist created a fake invitation ostensibly from the Museum of Modern Art’s Board of Trustees for a reception celebrating a fictitious Diao retrospective. The design is copied from a 1939 invitation to the Trustees’ reception for Pablo Picasso: 40 Years of His Art.

    David Diao (b. 1943), 40 Years of His Art, 2013. Acrylic and vinyl on canvas, 40 × 60 in. (101.5 × 153 cm). Collection of the artist; courtesy Postmasters Gallery, New York. © David Diao

  7. We don’t always realize that what we see…we also feel.

    — Biennial artist John Mason discusses ways of looking at sculpture and how he became an artist.

  8. blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC, Whitney Biennial edition:  Biennial artist Paul Druecke collaborated with poet Donna Stonecipher  on this wall work, which sits by the little bridge that links the Whitney Museum to the rest of New York. It captures the language of commemorative plaques that we place here and there across most of our cities, as we testify to the histories that we live among and that risk being lost to us. (I recognize the “falconer” line from the plaque on a Victorian statue that I jog by in Central Park, and the “somber, heavy, and even brutal” passage is boilerplate that refers to the Whitney itself.) By providing a mash-up of so many separate commemorations, Druecke and Stonecipher distill out a poignant, generalized sense of our efforts to preserve memories. When we put up any plaque, they seem to be saying, the act of erecting it matters as much as the information it bears. This Whitney work, you could say, is a plaque that commemorates all our other plaques. (Photo by Lucy Hogg)
The Daily Pic also appears at blogs.artinfo.com/the-daily-pic. For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.

    blakegopnik:

    THE DAILY PIC, Whitney Biennial edition:  Biennial artist Paul Druecke collaborated with poet Donna Stonecipher  on this wall work, which sits by the little bridge that links the Whitney Museum to the rest of New York. It captures the language of commemorative plaques that we place here and there across most of our cities, as we testify to the histories that we live among and that risk being lost to us. (I recognize the “falconer” line from the plaque on a Victorian statue that I jog by in Central Park, and the “somber, heavy, and even brutal” passage is boilerplate that refers to the Whitney itself.) By providing a mash-up of so many separate commemorations, Druecke and Stonecipher distill out a poignant, generalized sense of our efforts to preserve memories. When we put up any plaque, they seem to be saying, the act of erecting it matters as much as the information it bears. This Whitney work, you could say, is a plaque that commemorates all our other plaques. (Photo by Lucy Hogg)

    The Daily Pic also appears at blogs.artinfo.com/the-daily-pic. For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.

  9. #AmericanArtIs an ongoing conversation. The 2014 Biennial is up for debate. Love it? Hate it? Have your say. 

    #AmericanArtIs an ongoing conversation. The 2014 Biennial is up for debate. Love it? Hate it? Have your say. 

  10. Artinfo talks to 2014 Biennial curators Stuart Comer, Anthony Elms, and Michelle Grabner.

  11. This weekend at the Biennial, HOWDOYOUSAYYAMINAFRICAN? debuts a new film. The spoken, chanted, sung, and screamed libretto explores the consequences of centuries of global racial strife that are thrust upon on those born of African descent.
HOWDOYOUSAYYAMINAFRICAN?, Good Stock on the Dimension Floor: An Opera, 2014. Video, color, sound; 54 minutes. Collection of the artists. © HOWDOYOUSAYYAMINAFRICAN?

    This weekend at the Biennial, HOWDOYOUSAYYAMINAFRICAN? debuts a new film. The spoken, chanted, sung, and screamed libretto explores the consequences of centuries of global racial strife that are thrust upon on those born of African descent.

    HOWDOYOUSAYYAMINAFRICAN?, Good Stock on the Dimension Floor: An Opera, 2014. Video, color, sound; 54 minutes. Collection of the artists. © HOWDOYOUSAYYAMINAFRICAN?

  12. #AmericanArtIs UP FOR DEBATE. The 2014 Biennial is on view now. See it today and tell us what you think. 

    #AmericanArtIs UP FOR DEBATE. The 2014 Biennial is on view now. See it today and tell us what you think. 

  13. Finishing touches! Installing the front window vinyl before the 2014 Biennial opens to the public today.

    Finishing touches! Installing the front window vinyl before the 2014 Biennial opens to the public today.

  14. Sheila Hicks’s cascading installation in the 2014 Biennial is made of acrylic, linen, cotton, bamboo, and silk. Experience it in person starting Friday.

    Sheila Hicks’s cascading installation in the 2014 Biennial is made of acrylic, linen, cotton, bamboo, and silk. Experience it in person starting Friday.

  15. A first look at Tony Tasset’s 2014 Biennial work, Artists Monument, on view on 17th Street between Chelsea Piers and Pier 57 in Hudson River Park. 

    A first look at Tony Tasset’s 2014 Biennial work, Artists Monument, on view on 17th Street between Chelsea Piers and Pier 57 in Hudson River Park.