1. From Marsden Hartley to Cindy Sherman, there’s something for everyone in Art Everywhere USCast your vote now and tell us which iconic American artworks you want to see on billboards, trains, and buses across the country—including twenty from the Whitney’s permanent collection.

  2. When I think of art I think of beauty. Beauty is the mystery of life. It is not in the eye, it is in the mind.

    — Agnes Martin, born on this day in 1912.

  3. Happy first day of spring!
Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Le Pavillon de Flore in the Spring, 1907. Oil on canvas. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest. © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by Whitney Museum of American Art

    Happy first day of spring!

    Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Le Pavillon de Flore in the Spring, 1907. Oil on canvas. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest. © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by Whitney Museum of American Art

  4. In this video from 2010, artist Dennis Oppenheim discusses the aggressive and rhythmic quality of the four-screen film installation, Echo (1974), as well as its relationship to body art.

    You can see Oppenheim’s Projects (1973), a portfolio of ten prints, through Sunday in In Parts.

  5. Don’t miss Edward Steichen in the 1920s and 1930s: A Recent Acquisition, on view through Sunday. The exhibition features more than forty works by the “godfather of modern fashion photography” (Gotham).

  6. Color is whatever comes out of the material and keeps it what it is.

    — Eva Hesse, who was born today in 1936. 

  7. Here’s some much needed sun on this snowy December day! Florine Stettheimer's painting is one of several works from the Museum’s collection that T. J. Wilcox selected to be included in his current exhibition In the Air. 
Florine Stettheimer, Sun, 1931. Oil on canvas, 38 1/8 × 26 1/8 in. (96.8 × 66.4 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase 73.36a-b

    Here’s some much needed sun on this snowy December day! Florine Stettheimer's painting is one of several works from the Museum’s collection that T. J. Wilcox selected to be included in his current exhibition In the Air

    Florine Stettheimer, Sun, 1931. Oil on canvas, 38 1/8 × 26 1/8 in. (96.8 × 66.4 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase 73.36a-b

  8. When Matthew Skopek began working as a conservator at the Whitney in 2006, Franz Kline's Mahoning (1956) was installed as part of a collection exhibition at the Museum. Ever since viewing the painting seven years ago, he wanted to restore it. Read more on Whitney Stories.

  9. Painting relates to both art and life…I try to act in that gap between the two.

    — Robert Rauschenberg, who was born today in 1925.

  10. Test Pattern presents a selection of works by young and emerging artists—including Tauba Auerbach, Michele Abeles, and Nick Mauss—that have recently entered the Museum’s collection and which demonstrate a shared interest in investigating the entangled roles of materiality, reproduction, and process. The exhibition is on view through December 1.

  11. This Friday, experience an immersive evening of live performance and culinary invention at SYNONYM FOR UNTITLED. Untitled chef Chris Bradley will prepare a tasting menu based on a grocery list created by artist Andrew Lampert, which makes associative pairings between artists in the Whitney’s collection and culinary ingredients. The evening will also feature contributions from poet Mónica de la Torre, cellist Okkyung Lee, and violinist C. Spencer Yeh. Visit whitney.org for more information. 

    This Friday, experience an immersive evening of live performance and culinary invention at SYNONYM FOR UNTITLED. Untitled chef Chris Bradley will prepare a tasting menu based on a grocery list created by artist Andrew Lampert, which makes associative pairings between artists in the Whitney’s collection and culinary ingredients. The evening will also feature contributions from poet Mónica de la Torre, cellist Okkyung Lee, and violinist C. Spencer Yeh. Visit whitney.org for more information. 

  12. Opening December 22, American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe will feature works by eighteen leading artists from the first half of the twentieth century. Individual galleries will be devoted to Edward Hopper, Stuart Davis, Jacob Lawrence, and others at the core of the Museum’s collection.
Joseph Stella (1877–1946), The Brooklyn Bridge: Variation on an Old Theme, 1939. Oil on canvas, 70 × 42 in. (177.8 × 106.7 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase 42.15

    Opening December 22, American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe will feature works by eighteen leading artists from the first half of the twentieth century. Individual galleries will be devoted to Edward Hopper, Stuart Davis, Jacob Lawrence, and others at the core of the Museum’s collection.

    Joseph Stella (1877–1946), The Brooklyn Bridge: Variation on an Old Theme, 1939. Oil on canvas, 70 × 42 in. (177.8 × 106.7 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase 42.15

  13. One needs just a certain amount of trouble. Some people need more trouble to operate, and some people need less.

    — Another great Robert Rauschenberg quote from an audio recording from the Smithsonian Archives of American Art

  14. “When you get to New York take your pictures under your arm and show them to anyone you think might be interested. … You will just have to find your way as best you can. It seems to me very odd that you are so ambitious to show your paintings here, but I wish the best for you.”
Georgia O’Keeffe in a letter to Yayoi Kusama, which is on view in our Kusama retrospective. Isn’t O’Keeffe’s handwriting beautiful?
As a young woman living in Japan, Kusama found O’Keeffe’s address in a Who’s Who reference book at the American Embassy in Tokyo. The two began a correspondence which turned into a friendship. 

    When you get to New York take your pictures under your arm and show them to anyone you think might be interested. … You will just have to find your way as best you can. It seems to me very odd that you are so ambitious to show your paintings here, but I wish the best for you.”

    Georgia O’Keeffe in a letter to Yayoi Kusama, which is on view in our Kusama retrospective. Isn’t O’Keeffe’s handwriting beautiful?

    As a young woman living in Japan, Kusama found O’Keeffe’s address in a Who’s Who reference book at the American Embassy in Tokyo. The two began a correspondence which turned into a friendship. 

  15. Can’t make it to see The Clock at Lincoln Center? Get your Christian Marclay fix with performance videos, graphic “scores,” and more from our summer 2010 exhibition Christian Marclay: Festival. 
lincolncenter:

(Credit goes to © Christian Marclay. Courtesy Paula Cooper Gallery, New York and White Cube, London. Photo: Todd-White Photography. Christian Marclay; Detail of The Clock, 2010; Single-channel video with sound; 24 hours.)
Earlier today, we talked to people waiting in line (some for up to four hours!) for Christian Marclay’s spectacular 24-hour work of video art The Clock at Lincoln Center’s David Rubenstein Atrium. You only have one more day to check it out as part of this year’s Lincoln Center Festival if you haven’t already!
 

    Can’t make it to see The Clock at Lincoln Center? Get your Christian Marclay fix with performance videos, graphic “scores,” and more from our summer 2010 exhibition Christian Marclay: Festival

    lincolncenter:

    (Credit goes to © Christian Marclay. Courtesy Paula Cooper Gallery, New York and White Cube, London. Photo: Todd-White Photography. Christian Marclay; Detail of The Clock, 2010; Single-channel video with sound; 24 hours.)

    Earlier today, we talked to people waiting in line (some for up to four hours!) for Christian Marclay’s spectacular 24-hour work of video art The Clock at Lincoln Center’s David Rubenstein Atrium. You only have one more day to check it out as part of this year’s Lincoln Center Festival if you haven’t already!