1. Perfect for a rainy, late summer day: Pat Steir’s September Evening Waterfall (1991). 

    Perfect for a rainy, late summer day: Pat Steir’s September Evening Waterfall (1991). 

  2. Today, the two artists with whom the Whitney has been most closely identified were born: Edward Hopper in 1882 and Alexander Calder in 1898. You can see their work on the fifth-floor mezzanine. 

    Today, the two artists with whom the Whitney has been most closely identified were born: Edward Hopper in 1882 and Alexander Calder in 1898. You can see their work on the fifth-floor mezzanine

  3. The fifth-floor galleries reopen today with three new exhibitions. Shaping a Collection: Five Decades of Gifts includes iconic works by Jean-Michel Basquiat, Ed Ruscha, Andy Warhol, and many others. The fifth-floor mezzanine galleries will sample the Whitney’s holdings of work by Edward Hopper, whose work will be shown alongside examples of contemporary photography, and Alexander Calder.
Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Second Story Sunlight, 1960. Oil on canvas. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Friends of the Whitney Museum of American Art. © Whitney Museum of American Art. Photograph by Sheldan C. Collins

    The fifth-floor galleries reopen today with three new exhibitions. Shaping a Collection: Five Decades of Gifts includes iconic works by Jean-Michel Basquiat, Ed Ruscha, Andy Warhol, and many others. The fifth-floor mezzanine galleries will sample the Whitney’s holdings of work by Edward Hopper, whose work will be shown alongside examples of contemporary photography, and Alexander Calder.

    Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Second Story Sunlight, 1960. Oil on canvas. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Friends of the Whitney Museum of American Art. © Whitney Museum of American Art. Photograph by Sheldan C. Collins

  4. Happy Fourth of July! Three Flags will hit billboards nationwide this August as part of Art Everywhere US. The real thing will also be on view at the Whitney later this month.
Jasper Johns (b. 1930), Three Flags, 1958. Encaustic on canvas. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; 50th Anniversary Gift of the Gilman Foundation Inc., The Lauder Foundation, A. Alfred Taubman, Laura-Lee Whittier Woods, and purchase. Art © Jasper Johns / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

    Happy Fourth of July! Three Flags will hit billboards nationwide this August as part of Art Everywhere US. The real thing will also be on view at the Whitney later this month.

    Jasper Johns (b. 1930), Three Flags, 1958. Encaustic on canvas. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; 50th Anniversary Gift of the Gilman Foundation Inc., The Lauder Foundation, A. Alfred Taubman, Laura-Lee Whittier Woods, and purchase. Art © Jasper Johns / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

  5. From Marsden Hartley to Cindy Sherman, there’s something for everyone in Art Everywhere USCast your vote now and tell us which iconic American artworks you want to see on billboards, trains, and buses across the country—including twenty from the Whitney’s permanent collection.

  6. When I think of art I think of beauty. Beauty is the mystery of life. It is not in the eye, it is in the mind.

    — Agnes Martin, born on this day in 1912.

  7. Happy first day of spring!
Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Le Pavillon de Flore in the Spring, 1907. Oil on canvas. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest. © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by Whitney Museum of American Art

    Happy first day of spring!

    Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Le Pavillon de Flore in the Spring, 1907. Oil on canvas. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest. © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by Whitney Museum of American Art

  8. Chrissie Iles, Anne & Joel Ehrenkranz Curator, in Conversation with Dennis Oppenheim on 'Echo,' 1973 from Whitney Museum of American Art on Vimeo.

    In this video from 2010, artist Dennis Oppenheim discusses the aggressive and rhythmic quality of the four-screen film installation, Echo (1974), as well as its relationship to body art.

    You can see Oppenheim’s Projects (1973), a portfolio of ten prints, through Sunday in In Parts.

  9. Don’t miss Edward Steichen in the 1920s and 1930s: A Recent Acquisition, on view through Sunday. The exhibition features more than forty works by the “godfather of modern fashion photography” (Gotham).

  10. Color is whatever comes out of the material and keeps it what it is.

    — Eva Hesse, who was born today in 1936. 

  11. Here’s some much needed sun on this snowy December day! Florine Stettheimer's painting is one of several works from the Museum’s collection that T. J. Wilcox selected to be included in his current exhibition In the Air. 
Florine Stettheimer, Sun, 1931. Oil on canvas, 38 1/8 × 26 1/8 in. (96.8 × 66.4 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase 73.36a-b

    Here’s some much needed sun on this snowy December day! Florine Stettheimer's painting is one of several works from the Museum’s collection that T. J. Wilcox selected to be included in his current exhibition In the Air

    Florine Stettheimer, Sun, 1931. Oil on canvas, 38 1/8 × 26 1/8 in. (96.8 × 66.4 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase 73.36a-b

  12. When Matthew Skopek began working as a conservator at the Whitney in 2006, Franz Kline's Mahoning (1956) was installed as part of a collection exhibition at the Museum. Ever since viewing the painting seven years ago, he wanted to restore it. Read more on Whitney Stories.

  13. Painting relates to both art and life…I try to act in that gap between the two.

    — Robert Rauschenberg, who was born today in 1925.

  14. Test Pattern presents a selection of works by young and emerging artists—including Tauba Auerbach, Michele Abeles, and Nick Mauss—that have recently entered the Museum’s collection and which demonstrate a shared interest in investigating the entangled roles of materiality, reproduction, and process. The exhibition is on view through December 1.

  15. This Friday, experience an immersive evening of live performance and culinary invention at SYNONYM FOR UNTITLED. Untitled chef Chris Bradley will prepare a tasting menu based on a grocery list created by artist Andrew Lampert, which makes associative pairings between artists in the Whitney’s collection and culinary ingredients. The evening will also feature contributions from poet Mónica de la Torre, cellist Okkyung Lee, and violinist C. Spencer Yeh. Visit whitney.org for more information. 

    This Friday, experience an immersive evening of live performance and culinary invention at SYNONYM FOR UNTITLED. Untitled chef Chris Bradley will prepare a tasting menu based on a grocery list created by artist Andrew Lampert, which makes associative pairings between artists in the Whitney’s collection and culinary ingredients. The evening will also feature contributions from poet Mónica de la Torre, cellist Okkyung Lee, and violinist C. Spencer Yeh. Visit whitney.org for more information.