1. Doing any year-end giving? Don’t forget the Whitney! All donations to our Annual Fund are 100% tax-deductible and support exhibitions, education programs, conservation projects, and more.
Elie Nadelman (1882–1946), Tango, 1920–24. Painted cherry wood and gesso, three units, 35 7/8 × 26 × 13 7/8 in. (91.1 × 66 × 35.2 cm) overall. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase with funds from the Mr. and Mrs. Arthur G. Altschul Purchase Fund, the Joan and Lester Avnet Purchase Fund, the Edgar William and Bernice Chrysler Garbisch Purchase Fund, the Mrs. Robert C. Graham Purchase Fund in honor of John I.H. Baur, the Mrs. Percy Uris Purchase Fund, and the Henry Schnakenberg Purchase Fund in honor of Juliana Force 88.1a-c

    Doing any year-end giving? Don’t forget the Whitney! All donations to our Annual Fund are 100% tax-deductible and support exhibitions, education programs, conservation projects, and more.

    Elie Nadelman (1882–1946), Tango, 1920–24. Painted cherry wood and gesso, three units, 35 7/8 × 26 × 13 7/8 in. (91.1 × 66 × 35.2 cm) overall. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase with funds from the Mr. and Mrs. Arthur G. Altschul Purchase Fund, the Joan and Lester Avnet Purchase Fund, the Edgar William and Bernice Chrysler Garbisch Purchase Fund, the Mrs. Robert C. Graham Purchase Fund in honor of John I.H. Baur, the Mrs. Percy Uris Purchase Fund, and the Henry Schnakenberg Purchase Fund in honor of Juliana Force 88.1a-c

  2. Love the Whitney? Take part in Giving Tuesday with a donation to our Annual Fund, which supports exhibitions, education programs, conservation projects, and more.
Edward Hopper (1882–1967), New York Interior, c. 1921. Oil on canvas. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest. © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York

    Love the Whitney? Take part in Giving Tuesday with a donation to our Annual Fund, which supports exhibitions, education programs, conservation projects, and more.

    Edward Hopper (1882–1967), New York Interior, c. 1921. Oil on canvas. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest. © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York

  3. When Matthew Skopek began working as a conservator at the Whitney in 2006, Franz Kline's Mahoning (1956) was installed as part of a collection exhibition at the Museum. Ever since viewing the painting seven years ago, he wanted to restore it. Read more on Whitney Stories.

  4. Whitney Stories: Carol Mancusi-Ungaro from Whitney Museum of American Art on Vimeo.

    In this first installment of the Whitney Stories video series, associate director for conservation and research Carol Mancusi-Ungaro discusses her professional background, the importance of the artist’s voice in contemporary art conservation, and plans for the conservation studio in the new building, opening in 2015.

  5. As part of its ongoing collaboration with the Museum of Modern Art, the Andy Warhol Film Project at the Whitney will be hosting two programs of rare, newly preserved Warhol films at MoMA this Sunday. Advance tickets may be purchased online, and Whitney members receive half price tickets at the door.
© The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, PA, a museum of Carnegie Institute. All rights reserved. Image courtesy of The Andy Warhol Film Project, Whitney Museum of American Art

    As part of its ongoing collaboration with the Museum of Modern Art, the Andy Warhol Film Project at the Whitney will be hosting two programs of rare, newly preserved Warhol films at MoMA this Sunday. Advance tickets may be purchased online, and Whitney members receive half price tickets at the door.

    © The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, PA, a museum of Carnegie Institute. All rights reserved. Image courtesy of The Andy Warhol Film Project, Whitney Museum of American Art

  6. Jay DeFeo's The Rose from Whitney Museum of American Art on Vimeo.

    Leah Levy, director and trustee of The Jay DeFeo Trust; David A. Ross, director of the Whitney from 1991–97; Lisa Phillips, curator at the Whitney from 1988–99; and Dana Miller, curator of the permanent collection at the Whitney, discuss Jay DeFeo's monumental painting The Rose (1958–66), focusing on the Whitney’s efforts to conserve the work. 

  7. We’re thrilled to announce the relaunch of Douglas Davis’s The World’s First Collaborative Sentence (1994). Comprised of more than 200,000 posts in a dozen languages, the visionary work is a living document of the Internet’s evolution. View both a historical and a live version—to which visitors can contribute again for the first time in years—on whitney.org.Douglas Davis (b. 1933), The World’s First Collaborative Sentence, 1994–, conserved 2012. HTML and CGI script. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Barbara Schwartz in honor of Eugene M. Schwartz 95.253. Originally commissioned by the Lehman College Art Gallery, The City University of New York, with the assistance of Gary Welz, Robert Schneider, and Susan Hoeltzel

    We’re thrilled to announce the relaunch of Douglas Davis’s The World’s First Collaborative Sentence (1994). Comprised of more than 200,000 posts in a dozen languages, the visionary work is a living document of the Internet’s evolution. View both a historical and a live version—to which visitors can contribute again for the first time in years—on whitney.org.

    Douglas Davis (b. 1933), The World’s First Collaborative Sentence, 1994–, conserved 2012. HTML and CGI script. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Barbara Schwartz in honor of Eugene M. Schwartz 95.253. Originally commissioned by the Lehman College Art Gallery, The City University of New York, with the assistance of Gary Welz, Robert Schneider, and Susan Hoeltzel

  8. Watch Whitney conservators Carol Mancusi-Ungaro and Eleonora Nagy, archivist Anita Duquette, and art historian Joan Simon describe the process of restoring one of the most beloved works in the Museum’s collection, Alexander Calder’s Circus.

    Calder’s Circus is on view now in American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe.

  9. May 11, 2012: In the stairwell, conservator Eleonora Nagy works on Charles Simonds’ Dwellings.

    Photographs by Gretchen Scott