1. Happy birthday, Jenny Holzer! 
Installation view of Jenny Holzer: PROTECT PROTECT (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, March 12–May 31, 2009). Photograph by Bill Orcutt

    Happy birthday, Jenny Holzer

    Installation view of Jenny Holzer: PROTECT PROTECT (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, March 12–May 31, 2009). Photograph by Bill Orcutt

  2. "Some commentators have talked about the Rabbit as a spaceman. Others have seen him as the Playboy bunny, or an orator holding up a microphone where the carrot is." —Jeff Koons: A Retrospective curator Scott Rothkopf on Rabbit (1986).

    "Some commentators have talked about the Rabbit as a spaceman. Others have seen him as the Playboy bunny, or an orator holding up a microphone where the carrot is." —Jeff Koons: A Retrospective curator Scott Rothkopf on Rabbit (1986).

  3. We love your Jeff Koons selfies!

  4. Detail of Jeff Koons's Play-Doh (1994–2014) via lizacharlesworth1.

    Detail of Jeff Koons's Play-Doh (1994–2014) via lizacharlesworth1.

  5. Lost dog!

    Lost dog!

  6. Teens are invited to explore Jeff Koons: A Retrospective during a free event tomorrow. More info on whitney.org.
Jeff Koons (b. 1955), Olive Oyl, 2003. Oil on canvas; 108 × 84 in. (274.3 × 213.4 cm). Private collection. © Jeff Koons

    Teens are invited to explore Jeff Koons: A Retrospective during a free event tomorrow. More info on whitney.org.

    Jeff Koons (b. 1955), Olive Oyl, 2003. Oil on canvas; 108 × 84 in. (274.3 × 213.4 cm). Private collection. © Jeff Koons

  7. Art is something that happens inside us. We look at things in the world, and we become excited by them. We understand our own possibilities of becoming. And that’s what art is.

    — Jeff Koons to The New York Times

  8. Examining the breadth and depth of thirty-five years of work by Jeff Koons, one of the most influential and controversial artists of the twentieth century, the Jeff Koons: A Retrospective exhibition catalogue features all of the artist’s most well-known pieces. 
Read the introductory essay by curator Scott Rothkopf on whitney.org.

    Examining the breadth and depth of thirty-five years of work by Jeff Koons, one of the most influential and controversial artists of the twentieth century, the Jeff Koons: A Retrospective exhibition catalogue features all of the artist’s most well-known pieces. 

    Read the introductory essay by curator Scott Rothkopf on whitney.org.

  9. We want to see YOU in Jeff Koons: A Retrospective! Share your photos with the hashtags #Koons #ArtSelfie, and we’ll regram our favs every week. Don’t forget to tag @whitneymuseum. 

    We want to see YOU in Jeff Koons: A Retrospective! Share your photos with the hashtags #Koons #ArtSelfie, and we’ll regram our favs every week. Don’t forget to tag @whitneymuseum

  10. For his Banality series, Jeff Koons worked with traditional German and Italian craftsmen to enlarge the subjects and render them in gilt porcelain and polychromed wood, materials more associated with housewares and tchotchkes than contemporary art.
Photograph via mcmondays.

    For his Banality series, Jeff Koons worked with traditional German and Italian craftsmen to enlarge the subjects and render them in gilt porcelain and polychromed wood, materials more associated with housewares and tchotchkes than contemporary art.

    Photograph via mcmondays.

  11. The Museum is closed today, but you can still get a sneak peek at Jeff Koons: A Retrospective. Here’s the monumental painting, Tulips (1995–98), which is hanging over our restaurant. 

    The Museum is closed today, but you can still get a sneak peek at Jeff Koons: A Retrospective. Here’s the monumental painting, Tulips (1995–98), which is hanging over our restaurant. 

  12. "A strong case for the rigor and, often, the beauty of Koons’s art." The New Yorker reviews Jeff Koons: A Retrospective.
Jeff Koons (b. 1955), Rabbit, 1986. Stainless steel; 41 × 19 × 12 in. (104.1 × 48.3 × 30.5 cm). Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago; partial gift of Stefan T. Edlis and H. Gael Neeson, 2000.21. © Jeff Koons

    "A strong case for the rigor and, often, the beauty of Koons’s art." The New Yorker reviews Jeff Koons: A Retrospective.

    Jeff Koons (b. 1955), Rabbit, 1986. Stainless steel; 41 × 19 × 12 in. (104.1 × 48.3 × 30.5 cm). Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago; partial gift of Stefan T. Edlis and H. Gael Neeson, 2000.21. © Jeff Koons

  13. The perfect final show for the Whitney’s building.

    — New York Magazine's Jerry Saltz on Jeff Koons: A Retrospective.

  14. “A gripping show. It chronicles a sculptural career that is singular for its profusion of color, crafts and materials; its opening up of historical avenues closed by Minimalism; and its faith in both accessibility and advanced art, that other New. And it’s a great way for the Whitney to decamp, tossing the Met the keys, knowing that we won’t soon forget that it still owns the place.” —The New York Times celebrates Jeff Koons: A Retrospective, opening today. 
Photograph by Fred R. Conrad for The New York Times

    “A gripping show. It chronicles a sculptural career that is singular for its profusion of color, crafts and materials; its opening up of historical avenues closed by Minimalism; and its faith in both accessibility and advanced art, that other New. And it’s a great way for the Whitney to decamp, tossing the Met the keys, knowing that we won’t soon forget that it still owns the place.” —The New York Times celebrates Jeff Koons: A Retrospective, opening today. 

    Photograph by Fred R. Conrad for The New York Times

  15. This Sunday evening, curator Scott Rothkopf will talk about the making of Jeff Koons: A Retrospective with writer and catalogue contributor Rachel Kushner. Get your tickets now.

    This Sunday evening, curator Scott Rothkopf will talk about the making of Jeff Koons: A Retrospective with writer and catalogue contributor Rachel Kushner. Get your tickets now.