1. Today, the two artists with whom the Whitney has been most closely identified were born: Edward Hopper in 1882 and Alexander Calder in 1898. You can see their work on the fifth-floor mezzanine. 

    Today, the two artists with whom the Whitney has been most closely identified were born: Edward Hopper in 1882 and Alexander Calder in 1898. You can see their work on the fifth-floor mezzanine

  2. The fifth-floor galleries reopen today with three new exhibitions. Shaping a Collection: Five Decades of Gifts includes iconic works by Jean-Michel Basquiat, Ed Ruscha, Andy Warhol, and many others. The fifth-floor mezzanine galleries will sample the Whitney’s holdings of work by Edward Hopper, whose work will be shown alongside examples of contemporary photography, and Alexander Calder.
Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Second Story Sunlight, 1960. Oil on canvas. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Friends of the Whitney Museum of American Art. © Whitney Museum of American Art. Photograph by Sheldan C. Collins

    The fifth-floor galleries reopen today with three new exhibitions. Shaping a Collection: Five Decades of Gifts includes iconic works by Jean-Michel Basquiat, Ed Ruscha, Andy Warhol, and many others. The fifth-floor mezzanine galleries will sample the Whitney’s holdings of work by Edward Hopper, whose work will be shown alongside examples of contemporary photography, and Alexander Calder.

    Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Second Story Sunlight, 1960. Oil on canvas. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Friends of the Whitney Museum of American Art. © Whitney Museum of American Art. Photograph by Sheldan C. Collins

  3. The finalists have been announced and eleven works from the Whitney’s collection will appear in Art Everywhere U.S., the initiative that will transform billboards, bus shelters, subway platforms, and more into a free, open-air art gallery across the country. Look for them this August!

  4. When the Future Whitney opens next spring, its works on paper study center will allow scholars and students unprecedented access to the Museum’s vast array of twentieth and twenty-first century American drawings. In this Whitney Stories video, Carter Foster, Steven and Ann Ames Curator of Drawing, introduces plans for the space and describes the characteristics that make drawings a uniquely intimate form.

  5. Happy first day of spring!
Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Le Pavillon de Flore in the Spring, 1907. Oil on canvas. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest. © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by Whitney Museum of American Art

    Happy first day of spring!

    Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Le Pavillon de Flore in the Spring, 1907. Oil on canvas. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest. © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by Whitney Museum of American Art

  6. New on Whitney Stories: We talk to curator Dana Miller, who coordinated the loan of two of our Edward Hopper paintings to the The White House.

  7. We’re delighted to announce the loan of two of our Edward Hopper paintings to the White House!
President Barack Obama looks at the Edward Hopper paintings now displayed in the Oval Office, February 7, 2014. The paintings are Cobb’s Barns, South Truro, top, and Burly Cobb’s House, South Truro. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)

    We’re delighted to announce the loan of two of our Edward Hopper paintings to the White House!

    President Barack Obama looks at the Edward Hopper paintings now displayed in the Oval Office, February 7, 2014. The paintings are Cobb’s Barns, South Truro, top, and Burly Cobb’s House, South Truro. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)

  8. The most recent rotation of American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe is full of work to discover, including this 1977 sculpture by Roy Lichtenstein, Gold Fish Bowl. To illustrate the rich dialogue between America’s pre- and post-war art, Lichtenstein’s work is installed alongside paintings by Edward Hopper.

    The most recent rotation of American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe is full of work to discover, including this 1977 sculpture by Roy Lichtenstein, Gold Fish Bowl. To illustrate the rich dialogue between America’s pre- and post-war art, Lichtenstein’s work is installed alongside paintings by Edward Hopper.

  9. A look back at some of our favorite moments of 2013. 

  10. Love the Whitney? Take part in Giving Tuesday with a donation to our Annual Fund, which supports exhibitions, education programs, conservation projects, and more.
Edward Hopper (1882–1967), New York Interior, c. 1921. Oil on canvas. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest. © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York

    Love the Whitney? Take part in Giving Tuesday with a donation to our Annual Fund, which supports exhibitions, education programs, conservation projects, and more.

    Edward Hopper (1882–1967), New York Interior, c. 1921. Oil on canvas. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest. © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York

  11. Today is your last Sunday morning to spend at Hopper Drawing! Closing today, the exhibition presents Edward Hopper’s most celebrated paintings—including Nighthawks and New York Movie—alongside the drawings that inspired them.
Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Early Sunday Morning, 1930. Oil on canvas, 35 3/16 × 60 1/4 in. (89.4 × 153 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase with funds from Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney 31.426. © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by the Whitney Museum of American Art. Digital image © Whitney Museum of American Art

    Today is your last Sunday morning to spend at Hopper Drawing! Closing today, the exhibition presents Edward Hopper’s most celebrated paintings—including Nighthawks and New York Movie—alongside the drawings that inspired them.

    Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Early Sunday Morning, 1930. Oil on canvas, 35 3/16 × 60 1/4 in. (89.4 × 153 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase with funds from Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney 31.426. © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by the Whitney Museum of American Art. Digital image © Whitney Museum of American Art

  12. LAST CHANCE! See Edward Hopper’s beloved masterpieces alongside over 200 drawings that inspired them in Hopper Drawing, on view through Sunday.

  13. LAST WEEK! Don’t miss the rare opportunity to see Edward Hopper’s most celebrated paintings alongside the drawings that inspired them in Hopper Drawing, on view through Sunday.
Installation view of Hopper Drawing (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, May 23–October 6, 2013). Photograph by Sheldan C. Collins

    LAST WEEK! Don’t miss the rare opportunity to see Edward Hopper’s most celebrated paintings alongside the drawings that inspired them in Hopper Drawing, on view through Sunday.

    Installation view of Hopper Drawing (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, May 23–October 6, 2013). Photograph by Sheldan C. Collins

  14. Does this stretch of Seventh Avenue look familiar to you? If you’re an Edward Hopper fan, there’s a good chance the answer is yes; the street served as inspiration for Early Sunday Morning.

    Check out this video in which Whitney curator Carter Foster visits sites in downtown New York that inspired Hopper’s most iconic paintings. See the works in person in Hopper Drawing, on view through Sunday.

  15. This Saturday we’re opening early—just for families! Parents and kids of all ages are invited to explore Hopper Drawing through tours, workshops, and a collaborative drawing project led by artist Jason Polan. To learn more about Hopper Drawing Family Day, visit whitney.org.
Photograph by Filip Wolak

    This Saturday we’re opening early—just for families! Parents and kids of all ages are invited to explore Hopper Drawing through tours, workshops, and a collaborative drawing project led by artist Jason Polan. To learn more about Hopper Drawing Family Day, visit whitney.org.

    Photograph by Filip Wolak