1. Happy first day of spring!
Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Le Pavillon de Flore in the Spring, 1907. Oil on canvas. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest. © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by Whitney Museum of American Art

    Happy first day of spring!

    Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Le Pavillon de Flore in the Spring, 1907. Oil on canvas. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest. © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by Whitney Museum of American Art

  2. New on Whitney Stories: We talk to curator Dana Miller, who coordinated the loan of two of our Edward Hopper paintings to the The White House.

  3. We’re delighted to announce the loan of two of our Edward Hopper paintings to the White House!
President Barack Obama looks at the Edward Hopper paintings now displayed in the Oval Office, February 7, 2014. The paintings are Cobb’s Barns, South Truro, top, and Burly Cobb’s House, South Truro. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)

    We’re delighted to announce the loan of two of our Edward Hopper paintings to the White House!

    President Barack Obama looks at the Edward Hopper paintings now displayed in the Oval Office, February 7, 2014. The paintings are Cobb’s Barns, South Truro, top, and Burly Cobb’s House, South Truro. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)

  4. The most recent rotation of American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe is full of work to discover, including this 1977 sculpture by Roy Lichtenstein, Gold Fish Bowl. To illustrate the rich dialogue between America’s pre- and post-war art, Lichtenstein’s work is installed alongside paintings by Edward Hopper.

    The most recent rotation of American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe is full of work to discover, including this 1977 sculpture by Roy Lichtenstein, Gold Fish Bowl. To illustrate the rich dialogue between America’s pre- and post-war art, Lichtenstein’s work is installed alongside paintings by Edward Hopper.

  5. A look back at some of our favorite moments of 2013. 

  6. Love the Whitney? Take part in Giving Tuesday with a donation to our Annual Fund, which supports exhibitions, education programs, conservation projects, and more.
Edward Hopper (1882–1967), New York Interior, c. 1921. Oil on canvas. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest. © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York

    Love the Whitney? Take part in Giving Tuesday with a donation to our Annual Fund, which supports exhibitions, education programs, conservation projects, and more.

    Edward Hopper (1882–1967), New York Interior, c. 1921. Oil on canvas. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest. © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York

  7. Today is your last Sunday morning to spend at Hopper Drawing! Closing today, the exhibition presents Edward Hopper’s most celebrated paintings—including Nighthawks and New York Movie—alongside the drawings that inspired them.
Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Early Sunday Morning, 1930. Oil on canvas, 35 3/16 × 60 1/4 in. (89.4 × 153 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase with funds from Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney 31.426. © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by the Whitney Museum of American Art. Digital image © Whitney Museum of American Art

    Today is your last Sunday morning to spend at Hopper Drawing! Closing today, the exhibition presents Edward Hopper’s most celebrated paintings—including Nighthawks and New York Movie—alongside the drawings that inspired them.

    Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Early Sunday Morning, 1930. Oil on canvas, 35 3/16 × 60 1/4 in. (89.4 × 153 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase with funds from Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney 31.426. © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by the Whitney Museum of American Art. Digital image © Whitney Museum of American Art

  8. LAST CHANCE! See Edward Hopper’s beloved masterpieces alongside over 200 drawings that inspired them in Hopper Drawing, on view through Sunday.

  9. LAST WEEK! Don’t miss the rare opportunity to see Edward Hopper’s most celebrated paintings alongside the drawings that inspired them in Hopper Drawing, on view through Sunday.
Installation view of Hopper Drawing (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, May 23–October 6, 2013). Photograph by Sheldan C. Collins

    LAST WEEK! Don’t miss the rare opportunity to see Edward Hopper’s most celebrated paintings alongside the drawings that inspired them in Hopper Drawing, on view through Sunday.

    Installation view of Hopper Drawing (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, May 23–October 6, 2013). Photograph by Sheldan C. Collins

  10. Does this stretch of Seventh Avenue look familiar to you? If you’re an Edward Hopper fan, there’s a good chance the answer is yes; the street served as inspiration for Early Sunday Morning.

    Check out this video in which Whitney curator Carter Foster visits sites in downtown New York that inspired Hopper’s most iconic paintings. See the works in person in Hopper Drawing, on view through Sunday.

  11. This Saturday we’re opening early—just for families! Parents and kids of all ages are invited to explore Hopper Drawing through tours, workshops, and a collaborative drawing project led by artist Jason Polan. To learn more about Hopper Drawing Family Day, visit whitney.org.
Photograph by Filip Wolak

    This Saturday we’re opening early—just for families! Parents and kids of all ages are invited to explore Hopper Drawing through tours, workshops, and a collaborative drawing project led by artist Jason Polan. To learn more about Hopper Drawing Family Day, visit whitney.org.

    Photograph by Filip Wolak

  12. Join us Thursday for a screening of Hopper’s Silence, a film by one of Edward Hopper’s few lifelong friends, artist and author Brian O’Doherty. O’Doherty will screen the documentary and discuss its origin: a rare TV interview he secured with the mysterious artist. 
Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Study for New York Movie, 1938 or 1939. Fabricated chalk on paper, 8 3/8 × 10 15/16 in. (21.3 × 27.8 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest 70.100. © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by the Whitney Museum of American Art. Digital image © Whitney Museum of American Art

    Join us Thursday for a screening of Hopper’s Silence, a film by one of Edward Hopper’s few lifelong friends, artist and author Brian O’Doherty. O’Doherty will screen the documentary and discuss its origin: a rare TV interview he secured with the mysterious artist. 

    Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Study for New York Movie, 1938 or 1939. Fabricated chalk on paper, 8 3/8 × 10 15/16 in. (21.3 × 27.8 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest 70.100. © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by the Whitney Museum of American Art. Digital image © Whitney Museum of American Art

  13. Take a little Edward Hopper home with you. Peruse the Whitney Shop for custom-made prints, catalogues, accessories, and more featuring the artist’s iconic paintings and the drawings that inspired them.

    On Pinterest? Follow the Whitney Shop and re-pin Edward Hopper’s Early Sunday Morning for a chance to win a print of the iconic painting and a Hopper Drawing exhibition catalogue. We’ll announce the winner via Pinterest on Friday!

  14. Have a question for Hopper Drawing curator Carter Foster? Ask via Twitter by Tuesday, and we’ll post responses on Ask a Curator Day on September 18!
When asking a question, be sure to mention us (@whitneymuseum) and use the hashtag #askacurator.

    Have a question for Hopper Drawing curator Carter Foster? Ask via Twitter by Tuesday, and we’ll post responses on Ask a Curator Day on September 18!

    When asking a question, be sure to mention us (@whitneymuseum) and use the hashtag #askacurator.

  15. Join us this Thursday, as artists Dawn Clements, Gregory Crewdson, and Eric Fischl discuss Edward Hopper's lasting legacy on the work and practice of today’s artists with critic and writer Peter Schjeldahl. 
Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Study for Office at Night, 1940. Fabricated chalk and charcoal on paper, 15 1/16 × 19 5/8 in. (38.3 × 49.8 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest 70.340. © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by the Whitney Museum of American Art. Digital image © Whitney Museum of American Art

    Join us this Thursday, as artists Dawn Clements, Gregory Crewdson, and Eric Fischl discuss Edward Hopper's lasting legacy on the work and practice of today’s artists with critic and writer Peter Schjeldahl. 

    Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Study for Office at Night, 1940. Fabricated chalk and charcoal on paper, 15 1/16 × 19 5/8 in. (38.3 × 49.8 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest 70.340. © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by the Whitney Museum of American Art. Digital image © Whitney Museum of American Art