1. Invited to assemble a “show within a show” for the 2014 Biennial, Julie Ault selected as points of entry works by David Wojnarowicz (1954–1992) and Martin Wong (1946–1999) from the Whitney’s permanent collection, exhibiting them alongside artifacts from these artists’ personal archives, held by the Downtown Collection at New York University’s Fales Library.
Marvin J. Taylor is an archiving activist and the director of the Fales Library and Special Collections at New York University. Read a conversation between Taylor and Ault, which is part of Ault’s contribution to the 2014 Biennial.
Julie Ault, Afterlife: a constellation, 2014 (installation view, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York). Courtesy the artist

    Invited to assemble a “show within a show” for the 2014 Biennial, Julie Ault selected as points of entry works by David Wojnarowicz (1954–1992) and Martin Wong (1946–1999) from the Whitney’s permanent collection, exhibiting them alongside artifacts from these artists’ personal archives, held by the Downtown Collection at New York University’s Fales Library.

    Marvin J. Taylor is an archiving activist and the director of the Fales Library and Special Collections at New York University. Read a conversation between Taylor and Ault, which is part of Ault’s contribution to the 2014 Biennial.

    Julie Ault, Afterlife: a constellation, 2014 (installation view, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York). Courtesy the artist

  2. For the first Biennial, artists—among them Grant Wood, Arshile Gorky, and Georgia O’Keeffe—were invited to submit works of their own choosing, continuing the tradition of nonjuried exhibitions surveying new American art which began at the Whitney Studio Club in 1918.
Installation view of the First Biennial Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting, November 23, 1932–January 5, 1933, Whitney Museum of American Art

    For the first Biennial, artists—among them Grant Wood, Arshile Gorky, and Georgia O’Keeffe—were invited to submit works of their own choosing, continuing the tradition of nonjuried exhibitions surveying new American art which began at the Whitney Studio Club in 1918.

    Installation view of the First Biennial Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting, November 23, 1932–January 5, 1933, Whitney Museum of American Art

  3. During the nearly fifteen years that Vincent Punch has been a guard at the Whitney, he has seen myriad exhibitions, snapped countless candid photos, and developed a distinct eye for spontaneous visual arrangements that take place every day in the galleries. In this Whitney Stories video, he shares his observations on working as a guard, and offers his unique perspective on the Whitney and its future.

  4. The 2014 Biennial is on view through May 25. See it today at the Whitney, or everywhere else tomorrow. 

    The 2014 Biennial is on view through May 25. See it today at the Whitney, or everywhere else tomorrow. 

  5. Behind-the-scenes look at the planning of Jeff Koons: A Retrospective. The exhibition, which will fill nearly the entirety of the Whitney’s Marcel Breuer building, opens June 27. 

    Behind-the-scenes look at the planning of Jeff Koons: A Retrospective. The exhibition, which will fill nearly the entirety of the Whitney’s Marcel Breuer building, opens June 27. 

  6. #AmericanArtIs an ongoing conversation. The 2014 Biennial is up for debate. Love it? Hate it? Have your say. 

    #AmericanArtIs an ongoing conversation. The 2014 Biennial is up for debate. Love it? Hate it? Have your say. 

  7. #AmericanArtIs UP FOR DEBATE. The 2014 Biennial is on view now. See it today and tell us what you think. 

    #AmericanArtIs UP FOR DEBATE. The 2014 Biennial is on view now. See it today and tell us what you think. 

  8. Putting the finishing touches on the 2014 Biennial. The exhibition opens Friday!

    Putting the finishing touches on the 2014 Biennial. The exhibition opens Friday!

  9. With film, it’s hard to locate the artwork: Is it the projected image? The projection beam? The room in which it’s being projected? It’s a constellation of things rather than a singular object. I think that’s a metaphor for how a lot of artists working in a broad range of media function now.

    — Stuart Comer, one of the three curators of the 2014 BiennialIn the second installment of a three-part Q&A in Whitney Stories, Comer, Michelle Grabner, and Anthony Elms discuss their curatorial approaches as each organizes a floor of the exhibition.

  10. The 2014 Biennial catalogue is now available! Pick one up at the Museum Shop.

    The 2014 Biennial catalogue is now available! Pick one up at the Museum Shop.

  11. The New York Times previews the 2014 Biennial, highlighting some of the themes—nostalgia, women revitalizing abstract painting, architecture, and more—that figure prominently in the seventy-seventh edition of the Museum’s signature exhibition.
Laura Owens (b. 1970), Untitled, 2013 (detail). Oil, Flashe, acrylic, bike wheels, training wheels, wagon wheels, and tricycle wheel on linen, 108 × 84 in. (274.3 × 213.4 cm), Private collection; courtesy the artist and Gavin Brown’s enterprise, New York. Photograph by Tom Powel

    The New York Times previews the 2014 Biennial, highlighting some of the themes—nostalgia, women revitalizing abstract painting, architecture, and more—that figure prominently in the seventy-seventh edition of the Museum’s signature exhibition.

    Laura Owens (b. 1970), Untitled, 2013 (detail). Oil, Flashe, acrylic, bike wheels, training wheels, wagon wheels, and tricycle wheel on linen, 108 × 84 in. (274.3 × 213.4 cm), Private collection; courtesy the artist and Gavin Brown’s enterprise, New York. Photograph by Tom Powel

  12. Burgoyne Diller is one of the new artists featured in the latest installation of American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe, which showcases the Whitney’s holdings of artwork from the first half of the twentieth century alongside that of postwar figures. 

    Burgoyne Diller is one of the new artists featured in the latest installation of American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe, which showcases the Whitney’s holdings of artwork from the first half of the twentieth century alongside that of postwar figures. 

  13. Architect Renzo Piano designed the Whitney’s future home, which will open to the public in 2015. In this Whitney Stories video, Piano articulates the philosophy behind the building’s design and describes the experiences envisioned for its spaces—from its expansive galleries to its city-facing terraces.

  14. Installation view of Edward Steichen in the 1920s and 1930s: A Recent Acquisition (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, December 6, 2013–February 23, 2014). Photograph by John Muggenborg

    Installation view of Edward Steichen in the 1920s and 1930s: A Recent Acquisition (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, December 6, 2013–February 23, 2014). Photograph by John Muggenborg

  15. What most informs my curating are conversations with living artists, trying to find secret histories that haven’t been properly acknowledged, and travel—getting out of my comfort zone to find new places and new conversations.

    — Stuart Comer, one of the three curators of the 2014 BiennialIn the first installment of a three-part Q&A in Whitney Stories, Comer, Michelle Grabner, and Anthony Elms share their thoughts on curating the Museum’s signature exhibition.