1. banquethall:

Whitney Biennial 2014 Part III
Gretchen Bender (Remade by Philip Vanderhyden)

    banquethall:

    Whitney Biennial 2014 Part III

    Gretchen Bender (Remade by Philip Vanderhyden)

  2. Alex Jovanovich’s 35mm slideshows employ a stark, typically black-and-white palette, a deliberate pace, and poetic language hearkening back to the Old Testament and American Puritanism to explore romantic subjects such as love, spirituality, melancholy, and the cosmos. See his installation at the Biennial through Sunday. 
Alex Jovanovich (b. 1975), Untitled, 2014. 35 mm slideshow; 6 mins., 40 secs. Collection of the artist; courtesy the artist. © Alex Jovanovich

    Alex Jovanovich’s 35mm slideshows employ a stark, typically black-and-white palette, a deliberate pace, and poetic language hearkening back to the Old Testament and American Puritanism to explore romantic subjects such as love, spirituality, melancholy, and the cosmos. See his installation at the Biennial through Sunday. 

    Alex Jovanovich (b. 1975), Untitled, 2014. 35 mm slideshow; 6 mins., 40 secs. Collection of the artist; courtesy the artist. © Alex Jovanovich

  3. As part of Biennial artist Julie Ault’s Afterlife: a constellation, James Benning’s Easy Rider, a re-creation of Dennis Hopper’s 1969 classic film by the same name, is screening Sunday evening. 
On Tuesday, Benning and writer William Least Heat-Moon will discuss their shared interests in the personal, cultural, political, and geographical histories of place. Tickets are available on whitney.org.
James Benning, still from Easy Rider, 2012. High-definition video, color, sound; 95 min. Courtesy the artist. © James Benning

    As part of Biennial artist Julie Ault’s Afterlife: a constellation, James Benning’s Easy Rider, a re-creation of Dennis Hopper’s 1969 classic film by the same name, is screening Sunday evening. 

    On Tuesday, Benning and writer William Least Heat-Moon will discuss their shared interests in the personal, cultural, political, and geographical histories of place. Tickets are available on whitney.org.

    James Benning, still from Easy Rider, 2012. High-definition video, color, sound; 95 min. Courtesy the artist. © James Benning

  4. I’ll mimic the media—but I’ll turn up the voltage on the currents so high that hopefully it will blast criticality out there.

    — Gretchen Bender in conversation with Cindy Sherman. Read an excerpt from the 1987 BOMB interview in the 2014 Biennial catalogue

  5. This week, Academy Records presents two works running simultaneously in the Film and Video Gallery. The Bower, a film loop of blossoming cherry trees, plays continuously over the three-hour audio work No Jets, a field recording of the flight path to Chicago’s O’Hare airport during the flight delay after the September 11, 2001 attacks.
Academy Records, still from The Bower, 2011-13. 16mm film, color, silent; approx. 1:30 minutes, looped. Collection of the artist. Courtesy the artist. © Stephen Lacy

    This week, Academy Records presents two works running simultaneously in the Film and Video Gallery. The Bower, a film loop of blossoming cherry trees, plays continuously over the three-hour audio work No Jets, a field recording of the flight path to Chicago’s O’Hare airport during the flight delay after the September 11, 2001 attacks.

    Academy Records, still from The Bower, 2011-13. 16mm film, color, silent; approx. 1:30 minutes, looped. Collection of the artist. Courtesy the artist. © Stephen Lacy

  6. Zackary Drucker and Rhys Ernst’s collaborative short film She Gone Rogue is screening every half hour during Museum hours, beginning at 11:15 am.

    Zackary Drucker and Rhys Ernst’s collaborative short film She Gone Rogue is screening every half hour during Museum hours, beginning at 11:15 am.

  7. Join us for the third and final week of screenings featuring the work of Lucien Castaing-Taylor, Véréna Paravel, and Sensory Ethnography Lab. This week’s screenings include a rotating selection of work by filmmakers Diana Allan, Ilisa Barbash, Lucien Castaing-Taylor, Libbie Cohn, Aryo Danusiri, Ernst Karel, Toby Kim Lee, Helen Mirra, Véréna Paravel, Xu Ruotao, J.P. Sniadecki, Stephanie Spray, Katherine Tygielski, Pacho Velez, Pawel Wojtasi, and Huang Xiang. Visit whitney.org for a full schedule. 
Lucien Castaing-Taylor (b. 1966) and Véréna Paravel (b. 1971), still from Leviathan, 2012. Single-channel video, color, sound, 87 minutes. Courtesy Cinema Guild

    Join us for the third and final week of screenings featuring the work of Lucien Castaing-Taylor, Véréna Paravel, and Sensory Ethnography Lab. This week’s screenings include a rotating selection of work by filmmakers Diana Allan, Ilisa Barbash, Lucien Castaing-Taylor, Libbie Cohn, Aryo Danusiri, Ernst Karel, Toby Kim Lee, Helen Mirra, Véréna Paravel, Xu Ruotao, J.P. Sniadecki, Stephanie Spray, Katherine Tygielski, Pacho Velez, Pawel Wojtasi, and Huang Xiang. Visit whitney.org for a full schedule. 

    Lucien Castaing-Taylor (b. 1966) and Véréna Paravel (b. 1971), still from Leviathan, 2012. Single-channel video, color, sound, 87 minutes. Courtesy Cinema Guild

  8. The Biennial is bustling this weekend. Today, catch My Barbarian’s final performance, screenings by Sensory Ethnography Lab, or join a docent-led gallery tour.

    The Biennial is bustling this weekend. Today, catch My Barbarian’s final performance, screenings by Sensory Ethnography Lab, or join a docent-led gallery tour.

  9. Time Out New York gives a shout-out to five must-see works in the 2014 Biennial, including Gretchen Bender’s, People in Pain, remade by Philip Vanderhyden.
Gretchen Bender (1951–2004), People in Pain, 1988 (detail). Paint on heat-set vinyl and neon, 84 × 560 × 11 in. (213.4 × 1422.4 × 27.9 cm). Remade by Philip Vanderhyden, 2014. The Estate of Gretchen Bender. Photograph by Philip Vanderhyden

    Time Out New York gives a shout-out to five must-see works in the 2014 Biennial, including Gretchen Bender’s, People in Pain, remade by Philip Vanderhyden.

    Gretchen Bender (1951–2004), People in Pain, 1988 (detail). Paint on heat-set vinyl and neon, 84 × 560 × 11 in. (213.4 × 1422.4 × 27.9 cm). Remade by Philip Vanderhyden, 2014. The Estate of Gretchen Bender. Photograph by Philip Vanderhyden

  10. 2014 Biennial: Tarot Reading with Flawless Sabrina from Whitney Museum of American Art on Vimeo.

    2014 Biennial artists Zackary Drucker and Rhys Ernst visit the apartment of drag performance icon Flawless Sabrina, who features in Drucker and Ernst’s video She Gone Rogue. Flawless Sabrina performs a tarot reading for Drucker and the two discuss the pitfalls of success. 

    As part of the Biennial, Flawless Sabrina will hold tarot card readings at her apartment the weeks of March 24–April 13. Visit the project’s ticketing site to schedule an appointment.

  11. This weekend at the Biennial, HOWDOYOUSAYYAMINAFRICAN? debuts a new film. The spoken, chanted, sung, and screamed libretto explores the consequences of centuries of global racial strife that are thrust upon on those born of African descent.
HOWDOYOUSAYYAMINAFRICAN?, Good Stock on the Dimension Floor: An Opera, 2014. Video, color, sound; 54 minutes. Collection of the artists. © HOWDOYOUSAYYAMINAFRICAN?

    This weekend at the Biennial, HOWDOYOUSAYYAMINAFRICAN? debuts a new film. The spoken, chanted, sung, and screamed libretto explores the consequences of centuries of global racial strife that are thrust upon on those born of African descent.

    HOWDOYOUSAYYAMINAFRICAN?, Good Stock on the Dimension Floor: An Opera, 2014. Video, color, sound; 54 minutes. Collection of the artists. © HOWDOYOUSAYYAMINAFRICAN?

  12. Andrew Bujalski’s Computer Chess is screening all weekend at the Biennial. The filmmaker will be in conversation with Biennial curator Stuart Comer on Sunday. 
Andrew Bujalski, still from Computer Chess, 2013. NTSC analog video, black-and-white, sound; 92 minutes. © 2013 Computer Chess LLC.; courtesy the artist. Photograph by Alex Lipschultz

    Andrew Bujalski’s Computer Chess is screening all weekend at the Biennial. The filmmaker will be in conversation with Biennial curator Stuart Comer on Sunday

    Andrew Bujalski, still from Computer Chess, 2013. NTSC analog video, black-and-white, sound; 92 minutes. © 2013 Computer Chess LLC.; courtesy the artist. Photograph by Alex Lipschultz

  13. With film, it’s hard to locate the artwork: Is it the projected image? The projection beam? The room in which it’s being projected? It’s a constellation of things rather than a singular object. I think that’s a metaphor for how a lot of artists working in a broad range of media function now.

    — Stuart Comer, one of the three curators of the 2014 BiennialIn the second installment of a three-part Q&A in Whitney Stories, Comer, Michelle Grabner, and Anthony Elms discuss their curatorial approaches as each organizes a floor of the exhibition.

  14. Chrissie Iles, Anne & Joel Ehrenkranz Curator, in Conversation with Dennis Oppenheim on 'Echo,' 1973 from Whitney Museum of American Art on Vimeo.

    In this video from 2010, artist Dennis Oppenheim discusses the aggressive and rhythmic quality of the four-screen film installation, Echo (1974), as well as its relationship to body art.

    You can see Oppenheim’s Projects (1973), a portfolio of ten prints, through Sunday in In Parts.

  15. T. J. Wilcox: In the Air—a panoramic film installation inspired by New York City—closes today!
Installation view of T. J. Wilcox: In the Air, 2013 (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, September 19, 2013–February 9, 2014). Photograph by Bill Orcutt

    T. J. Wilcox: In the Air—a panoramic film installation inspired by New York City—closes today!

    Installation view of T. J. Wilcox: In the Air, 2013 (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, September 19, 2013–February 9, 2014). Photograph by Bill Orcutt