1. In celebration of Earth Day, here’s Georgia O’Keeffe’s Summer Days, which was inspired by the deserts of New Mexico. Cast your vote now for the chance to see Summer Days in the great outdoors as part of Art Everywhere US.
Georgia O’Keeffe (1887–1986), Summer Days, 1936. Oil on canvas, 36 × 30 in. (91.4 × 76.2 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Calvin Klein 94.171. © 2014 Georgia O’Keeffe Museum / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

    In celebration of Earth Day, here’s Georgia O’Keeffe’s Summer Days, which was inspired by the deserts of New Mexico. Cast your vote now for the chance to see Summer Days in the great outdoors as part of Art Everywhere US.

    Georgia O’Keeffe (1887–1986), Summer Days, 1936. Oil on canvas, 36 × 30 in. (91.4 × 76.2 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Calvin Klein 94.171. © 2014 Georgia O’Keeffe Museum / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

  2. For the first Biennial, artists—among them Grant Wood, Arshile Gorky, and Georgia O’Keeffe—were invited to submit works of their own choosing, continuing the tradition of nonjuried exhibitions surveying new American art which began at the Whitney Studio Club in 1918.
Installation view of the First Biennial Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting, November 23, 1932–January 5, 1933, Whitney Museum of American Art

    For the first Biennial, artists—among them Grant Wood, Arshile Gorky, and Georgia O’Keeffe—were invited to submit works of their own choosing, continuing the tradition of nonjuried exhibitions surveying new American art which began at the Whitney Studio Club in 1918.

    Installation view of the First Biennial Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting, November 23, 1932–January 5, 1933, Whitney Museum of American Art

  3. American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe opens today. Each gallery on the Museum’s fifth-floor will be devoted to presentations of the leading artists of the first half of the twentieth century, providing an in-depth look at the beloved work of Edward Hopper, Stuart Davis, and other icons of the Whitney’s collection.
Charles Demuth (1883–1935), My Egypt, 1927. Oil on fiberboard, 35 3/4 × 30 in. (90.8 × 76.2 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase with funds from Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney   31.172

    American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe opens today. Each gallery on the Museum’s fifth-floor will be devoted to presentations of the leading artists of the first half of the twentieth century, providing an in-depth look at the beloved work of Edward Hopper, Stuart Davis, and other icons of the Whitney’s collection.

    Charles Demuth (1883–1935), My Egypt, 1927. Oil on fiberboard, 35 3/4 × 30 in. (90.8 × 76.2 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase with funds from Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney   31.172

  4. Opening December 22, American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe will feature works by eighteen leading artists from the first half of the twentieth century. Individual galleries will be devoted to Edward Hopper, Stuart Davis, Jacob Lawrence, and others at the core of the Museum’s collection.
Joseph Stella (1877–1946), The Brooklyn Bridge: Variation on an Old Theme, 1939. Oil on canvas, 70 × 42 in. (177.8 × 106.7 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase 42.15

    Opening December 22, American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe will feature works by eighteen leading artists from the first half of the twentieth century. Individual galleries will be devoted to Edward Hopper, Stuart Davis, Jacob Lawrence, and others at the core of the Museum’s collection.

    Joseph Stella (1877–1946), The Brooklyn Bridge: Variation on an Old Theme, 1939. Oil on canvas, 70 × 42 in. (177.8 × 106.7 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase 42.15

  5. “When you get to New York take your pictures under your arm and show them to anyone you think might be interested. … You will just have to find your way as best you can. It seems to me very odd that you are so ambitious to show your paintings here, but I wish the best for you.”
Georgia O’Keeffe in a letter to Yayoi Kusama, which is on view in our Kusama retrospective. Isn’t O’Keeffe’s handwriting beautiful?
As a young woman living in Japan, Kusama found O’Keeffe’s address in a Who’s Who reference book at the American Embassy in Tokyo. The two began a correspondence which turned into a friendship. 

    When you get to New York take your pictures under your arm and show them to anyone you think might be interested. … You will just have to find your way as best you can. It seems to me very odd that you are so ambitious to show your paintings here, but I wish the best for you.”

    Georgia O’Keeffe in a letter to Yayoi Kusama, which is on view in our Kusama retrospective. Isn’t O’Keeffe’s handwriting beautiful?

    As a young woman living in Japan, Kusama found O’Keeffe’s address in a Who’s Who reference book at the American Embassy in Tokyo. The two began a correspondence which turned into a friendship.