1. “Art has this ability to allow you to connect back through history in the same way that biology does. I’m always looking for source material.” —Jeff Koons
Installation view Jeff Koons: A Retrospective (June 27–October 19, 2014), Whitney Museum of American Art, N.Y. © Jeff Koons. Photograph by Ron Amstutz

    “Art has this ability to allow you to connect back through history in the same way that biology does. I’m always looking for source material.” —Jeff Koons

    Installation view Jeff Koons: A Retrospective (June 27–October 19, 2014), Whitney Museum of American Art, N.Y. © Jeff Koons. Photograph by Ron Amstutz

  2. Tonight, Biennial artist Dawoud Bey, along with art historian and curator Sarah Lewis and scholar Imani Perry, will reflect on the role of art and photography in the visualization and construction of race, memory, and history. Follow along on Twitter.
Dawoud Bey, Barack Obama, 2008. Pigmented inkjet print. Collection of the artist; courtesy Stephen Daiter Gallery, Chicago 

    Tonight, Biennial artist Dawoud Bey, along with art historian and curator Sarah Lewis and scholar Imani Perry, will reflect on the role of art and photography in the visualization and construction of race, memory, and history. Follow along on Twitter.

    Dawoud Bey, Barack Obama, 2008. Pigmented inkjet print. Collection of the artist; courtesy Stephen Daiter Gallery, Chicago 

  3. On May 19, Biennial artist Dawoud Bey, along with art historian and curator Sarah Lewis and scholar Imani Perry, will reflect on the role of art and photography in the visualization and construction of race, memory, and history. Get your tickets now on whitney.org. 
Dawoud Bey (b. 1953), Maxine Adams and Amelia Maxwell (from The Birmingham Project), 2012. Two pigmented inkjet prints mounted on dibond, 40 × 64 in. (101.6 × 162.6 cm) overall. Collection of the artist. © Dawoud Bey

    On May 19, Biennial artist Dawoud Bey, along with art historian and curator Sarah Lewis and scholar Imani Perry, will reflect on the role of art and photography in the visualization and construction of race, memory, and history. Get your tickets now on whitney.org

    Dawoud Bey (b. 1953), Maxine Adams and Amelia Maxwell (from The Birmingham Project), 2012. Two pigmented inkjet prints mounted on dibond, 40 × 64 in. (101.6 × 162.6 cm) overall. Collection of the artist. © Dawoud Bey

  4. As part of Biennial artist Julie Ault’s Afterlife: a constellation, James Benning’s Easy Rider, a re-creation of Dennis Hopper’s 1969 classic film by the same name, is screening Sunday evening. 
On Tuesday, Benning and writer William Least Heat-Moon will discuss their shared interests in the personal, cultural, political, and geographical histories of place. Tickets are available on whitney.org.
James Benning, still from Easy Rider, 2012. High-definition video, color, sound; 95 min. Courtesy the artist. © James Benning

    As part of Biennial artist Julie Ault’s Afterlife: a constellation, James Benning’s Easy Rider, a re-creation of Dennis Hopper’s 1969 classic film by the same name, is screening Sunday evening. 

    On Tuesday, Benning and writer William Least Heat-Moon will discuss their shared interests in the personal, cultural, political, and geographical histories of place. Tickets are available on whitney.org.

    James Benning, still from Easy Rider, 2012. High-definition video, color, sound; 95 min. Courtesy the artist. © James Benning

  5. For the first Biennial, artists—among them Grant Wood, Arshile Gorky, and Georgia O’Keeffe—were invited to submit works of their own choosing, continuing the tradition of nonjuried exhibitions surveying new American art which began at the Whitney Studio Club in 1918.
Installation view of the First Biennial Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting, November 23, 1932–January 5, 1933, Whitney Museum of American Art

    For the first Biennial, artists—among them Grant Wood, Arshile Gorky, and Georgia O’Keeffe—were invited to submit works of their own choosing, continuing the tradition of nonjuried exhibitions surveying new American art which began at the Whitney Studio Club in 1918.

    Installation view of the First Biennial Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting, November 23, 1932–January 5, 1933, Whitney Museum of American Art

  6. The Whitney Women from Whitney Museum of American Art on Vimeo.

    As the Whitney prepares for its historic move downtown, Flora Miller Biddle discusses the three generations of “Whitney Women”—her grandmother Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, who in 1914 founded the Whitney Studio in Greenwich Village, and in 1930 the Whitney Museum of American Art; her mother Flora Whitney Miller, who served as the Museum’s President (1941–1966) and Chairman (1966–1974); and herself, who served as President (1977–1985) and is currently the Honorary Chairman of the Museum.

  7. I wanted to make a film that could include … a sort of sense that I think we all have looking at New York City of seeing it in the present and past tense simultaneously.

    — T. J. Wilcox, whose panoramic film installation, In the Air closes tomorrow.

  8. In 1972, Alma Thomas became the first African-American woman to have a solo exhibition at the Whitney.
archivesofamericanart:

It’s #museumselfie day today!
Alma Thomas with her work at the Whitney Museum, 1972? / unidentified photographer. Alma Thomas papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

    In 1972, Alma Thomas became the first African-American woman to have a solo exhibition at the Whitney.

    archivesofamericanart:

    It’s #museumselfie day today!

    Alma Thomas with her work at the Whitney Museum, 1972? / unidentified photographer. Alma Thomas papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

  9. "One of the most mesmerizing temporary sights in town…not to be missed and maybe never to be forgotten." —New York Magazine on T. J. Wilcox: In the Air, on view through February 9. 
Installation view of T. J. Wilcox: In the Air, 2013 (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, September 19, 2013–February 9, 2014). Photograph by Bill Orcutt

    "One of the most mesmerizing temporary sights in town…not to be missed and maybe never to be forgotten." —New York Magazine on T. J. Wilcox: In the Air, on view through February 9. 

    Installation view of T. J. Wilcox: In the Air, 2013 (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, September 19, 2013–February 9, 2014). Photograph by Bill Orcutt

  10. Happy birthday to our founder, Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, who was born today in 1875.
Robert Henri (1865–1929), Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, 1916. Oil on canvas, 50 × 72 in. (127 × 182.9 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Flora Whitney Miller 86.70.3 © Estate of Robert Henri

    Happy birthday to our founderGertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, who was born today in 1875.

    Robert Henri (1865–1929), Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, 1916. Oil on canvas, 50 × 72 in. (127 × 182.9 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Flora Whitney Miller 86.70.3 © Estate of Robert Henri

  11. Robert Indiana, LOVE, 1966 from Whitney Museum of American Art on Vimeo.

    Curator Barbara Haskell discusses the origins of artist Robert Indiana’s iconic work LOVE.

  12. archivesofamericanart:

Meet Juliana Force: not the first female director of the Whitney Museum but the first director of the Whitney Museum. Period.
Juliana Force, ca. 1931 / Cecil Walter Hardy Beaton, photographer. Marchal Landgren papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

    archivesofamericanart:

    Meet Juliana Force: not the first female director of the Whitney Museum but the first director of the Whitney Museum. Period.

    Juliana Force, ca. 1931 / Cecil Walter Hardy Beaton, photographer. Marchal Landgren papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

  13. This Thursday, join scholars Joachim Pissarro and Thomas Crow, along with curator Barbara Haskell, for a roundtable discussion about Robert Indiana in the context of his Pop artist contemporaries. Reserve your tickets now. 
Installation view of Robert Indiana: Beyond LOVE (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, September 26, 2013–January 5, 2014). © 2013 The Morgan Art Foundation, Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photograph by Sheldan C. Collins

    This Thursday, join scholars Joachim Pissarro and Thomas Crow, along with curator Barbara Haskell, for a roundtable discussion about Robert Indiana in the context of his Pop artist contemporaries. Reserve your tickets now. 

    Installation view of Robert Indiana: Beyond LOVE (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, September 26, 2013–January 5, 2014). © 2013 The Morgan Art Foundation, Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photograph by Sheldan C. Collins

  14. Today in 1931, the Whitney Museum of American Art opened on West 8th Street in Greenwich Village. Our new building will open downtown in 2015. Back to our roots! 
Photograph by Tim Schenck

    Today in 1931, the Whitney Museum of American Art opened on West 8th Street in Greenwich Village. Our new building will open downtown in 2015. Back to our roots! 

    Photograph by Tim Schenck

  15. This morning, we got a sneak peek of T. J. Wilcox's new panoramic film installation, In the Air, which opens to the public tomorrow.
From his Union Square studio, Wilcox filmed the 360-degree view of Manhattan from dawn to dusk. One by one, six projectors cut away from the cityscape to stories inspired by a particular view from the studio—from Andy Warhol’s welcoming the pope-mobile with silver Mylar balloons to the mesmerizing Manhattanhenge to an interview with the building’s super about his memory of September 11.

    This morning, we got a sneak peek of T. J. Wilcox's new panoramic film installation, In the Air, which opens to the public tomorrow.

    From his Union Square studio, Wilcox filmed the 360-degree view of Manhattan from dawn to dusk. One by one, six projectors cut away from the cityscape to stories inspired by a particular view from the studio—from Andy Warhol’s welcoming the pope-mobile with silver Mylar balloons to the mesmerizing Manhattanhenge to an interview with the building’s super about his memory of September 11.