1. “One of the most vitally new-feeling artworks on view in the city right now.” —GalleristNY on Trisha Baga: Plymouth Rock 2, on view through January 27.
Installation view of Trisha Baga: Plymouth Rock 2 (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, November 7, 2012–January 27, 2013). Photograph by Sheldan C. Collins

    “One of the most vitally new-feeling artworks on view in the city right now.” —GalleristNY on Trisha Baga: Plymouth Rock 2, on view through January 27.

    Installation view of Trisha Baga: Plymouth Rock 2 (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, November 7, 2012–January 27, 2013). Photograph by Sheldan C. Collins

  2. The Whitney Museum is New York’s go-to institution for the crazy-quilt history of early- and mid-20th-century American art, and its new permanent-collection display, “American Legends: Calder to O’Keeffe,” is one of its best in years.

    — The New York Times's Roberta Smith on American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe.

  3. Both exhibitions make you look anew at Pop, eschewing the high gloss and high camp for a more scabrous, if not always sinister, movement.

    —  The New York Times on Sinister Pop and Dark and Deadpan: Pop in TV and the Movies.

  4. In this impressive Whitney retrospective … I am reminded of what Ed Ruscha once said: “Good art should elicit a response of ‘Huh? Wow!’ as opposed to ‘Wow! Huh?’ ” That’s Artschwager.

    —  Jerry Saltz of New York magazine on Richard Artschwager!.

  5. An Enigma Wrapped in Formica: ‘Richard Artschwager!’ at Whitney Museum  

  6. Art can take you to funny places.

    — Richard Artschwager via ARTINFO

  7. In 2002, Wade Guyton invented a new paintbrush. Its name was the Epson printer.

    — Jerry Saltz of New York magazine gives “huge props” to Wade Guyton. Wade Guyton OS is on view through January 13. 

  8. GUYTON: I hated art as a kid. I didn’t even like art class. I didn’t like to draw. I would make my dad do all the drawings because I hated it so much. Once I won a contest—or rather, he did.

    ARMSTRONG: That’s so funny that you hated to draw.

    GUYTON: That’s why I don’t draw now and why I use the printer. [laughs]

    — Wade Guyton in conversation with David Armstrong in Interview Magazine

  9. rhizomedotorg:

    The language of Wade Guyton’s mid-career retrospective at the Whitney emphasizes that, like any other user, Guyton approaches technology unenlightened as to its inner workings.

    Giampaolo Bianconi’s review of Wade Guyton: here.

  10. The work is ingenious, and also moving, as a counterattack of the spirit on a culture whose proliferating technical means disembody imagination.

    — The New Yorker on Wade Guyton OS. Read the full article in the October 15 issue. 

  11. Yes, interesting art is being made here and now.

    — The New York Times' Roberta Smith on Wade Guyton OS

  12. Construction update! As you may know, the Whitney is constructing a new building in downtown Manhattan designed by Renzo Piano at the southern end of the High Line in the Meatpacking District. The new building will have stunning, unobstructed views to the west.
Photograph by Timothy Schenck

    Construction update! As you may know, the Whitney is constructing a new building in downtown Manhattan designed by Renzo Piano at the southern end of the High Line in the Meatpacking District. The new building will have stunning, unobstructed views to the west.

    Photograph by Timothy Schenck

  13. "I want to go to heaven knowing that I have created color in my own and other people’s lives."

    Yayoi Kusama on CBS Sunday Morning. Only a few more weeks to see Kusama’s retrospective before it closes September 30! 

    Submit questions for Kusama curator David Kiehl now. We’ll post his answers on Twitter for #askacurator day September 19. 

  14. Yayoi Kusama’s “Grand Orgy to Awaken the Dead at MoMA (Otherwise Known as the Museum of Modern Art)” took place on August 24, 1969 and made the front page of the Daily News the following day. 
Kusama publicized the event, saying, “At the museum you can take your clothes off in good company: RENOIR, MAILLOL, GIACOMETTI, PICASSO.”
Image via Lisa Thatcher

    Yayoi Kusama’s “Grand Orgy to Awaken the Dead at MoMA (Otherwise Known as the Museum of Modern Art)” took place on August 24, 1969 and made the front page of the Daily News the following day. 

    Kusama publicized the event, saying, “At the museum you can take your clothes off in good company: RENOIR, MAILLOL, GIACOMETTI, PICASSO.”

    Image via Lisa Thatcher

  15. "So much of Kusama’s work and persona is performance based so it is no surprise that the photograph has been an active part of her career as a form of documentation of both her work and self and it also should be no great wonder that she still has so many of these photographs (as many are credited to the artist’s personal collection).”
From “The Photographs of Yayoi Kusama” via ARTINFO
Yayoi Kusama at age 10, 1939. Collection of Yayoi Kusama. Image courtesy Yayoi Kusama Studio Inc.; Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo; Victoria Miro Gallery, London

    "So much of Kusama’s work and persona is performance based so it is no surprise that the photograph has been an active part of her career as a form of documentation of both her work and self and it also should be no great wonder that she still has so many of these photographs (as many are credited to the artist’s personal collection).”

    From “The Photographs of Yayoi Kusama” via ARTINFO

    Yayoi Kusama at age 10, 1939. Collection of Yayoi Kusama. Image courtesy Yayoi Kusama Studio Inc.; Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo; Victoria Miro Gallery, London