1. The installation for Shaping a Collection: Five Decades of Gifts is well underway! Here’s Andy Warhol’s Ethel Scull 36 Times at the final stage of installation. Each photograph is a discreet panel and the panels of each row are fixed together. The rows are installed from the bottom up.

    The installation for Shaping a Collection: Five Decades of Gifts is well underway! Here’s Andy Warhol’s Ethel Scull 36 Times at the final stage of installation. Each photograph is a discreet panel and the panels of each row are fixed together. The rows are installed from the bottom up.

  2. And the Jeff Koons: A Retrospective installation continues! Here’s an Antiquity sculpture…full-scale maquette next to the real deal. 

    And the Jeff Koons: A Retrospective installation continues! Here’s an Antiquity sculpture…full-scale maquette next to the real deal. 

  3. LAST CHANCE to see the 2014 Biennial before it closes Sunday! The seventy-seventh in the Museum’s ongoing series begun in 1932, this Biennial is the last to take place at 945 Madison Avenue before the Museum moves downtown in the spring of 2015.

  4. "Should you see it? That’s a silly question. Of course you should! It comes but once every two years, and it sets the baseline for art talk in between." —The New Yorker's Peter Schjeldahl.

    The 2014 Biennial closes Sunday.

  5. With a roster of 103 participants at all points in their careers, the 2014 Biennial features a wide range of works—from painting and sculpture to photography and installation. See it before it closes May 25!

    With a roster of 103 participants at all points in their careers, the 2014 Biennial features a wide range of works—from painting and sculpture to photography and installation. See it before it closes May 25!

  6. #AmericanArtIs happening now. Visit the 2014 Biennial before it closes May 25 and have your say.

  7. Alex Jovanovich’s 35mm slideshows employ a stark, typically black-and-white palette, a deliberate pace, and poetic language hearkening back to the Old Testament and American Puritanism to explore romantic subjects such as love, spirituality, melancholy, and the cosmos. See his installation at the Biennial through Sunday. 
Alex Jovanovich (b. 1975), Untitled, 2014. 35 mm slideshow; 6 mins., 40 secs. Collection of the artist; courtesy the artist. © Alex Jovanovich

    Alex Jovanovich’s 35mm slideshows employ a stark, typically black-and-white palette, a deliberate pace, and poetic language hearkening back to the Old Testament and American Puritanism to explore romantic subjects such as love, spirituality, melancholy, and the cosmos. See his installation at the Biennial through Sunday. 

    Alex Jovanovich (b. 1975), Untitled, 2014. 35 mm slideshow; 6 mins., 40 secs. Collection of the artist; courtesy the artist. © Alex Jovanovich

  8. bhsutton:

Joel Otterson's delightful installation from the 2014 Whitney Biennial (through May 25).

The chandeliers on view in Joel Otterson's Biennial installation are constructed from inexpensive thrift store glassware and modeled after late-nineteenth-century Baccarat “birdcage chandeliers” as well as Marcel Duchamp’s famous Bottle Rack (1914).

    bhsutton:

    Joel Otterson's delightful installation from the 2014 Whitney Biennial (through May 25).

    The chandeliers on view in Joel Otterson's Biennial installation are constructed from inexpensive thrift store glassware and modeled after late-nineteenth-century Baccarat “birdcage chandeliers” as well as Marcel Duchamp’s famous Bottle Rack (1914).

  9. iheartmyart:

    Terry Adkins, Aviarium, 2014. Steel, brass, aluminum, and silver, dimensions variable (installation view, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York). Estate of Terry Adkins; courtesy Salon 94, New York. Photograph by Blair Prentice (iheartmyart)

    Part of the Whitney Biennial 2014, New York, March 7– May 25, 2014

  10. Artworks from each curator’s section of the Biennial have been installed in a variety of places in addition to the main gallery floors. Here are a few—be sure to keep your eyes (and ears) peeled for these and other works during your visit.

  11. A look at the fourth floor of the 2014 Biennial, curated by Michelle Grabner.

  12. A look at the third floor of the 2014 Biennial, curated by Stuart Comer.

  13. Invited to assemble a “show within a show” for the 2014 Biennial, Julie Ault selected as points of entry works by David Wojnarowicz (1954–1992) and Martin Wong (1946–1999) from the Whitney’s permanent collection, exhibiting them alongside artifacts from these artists’ personal archives, held by the Downtown Collection at New York University’s Fales Library.
Marvin J. Taylor is an archiving activist and the director of the Fales Library and Special Collections at New York University. Read a conversation between Taylor and Ault, which is part of Ault’s contribution to the 2014 Biennial.
Julie Ault, Afterlife: a constellation, 2014 (installation view, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York). Courtesy the artist

    Invited to assemble a “show within a show” for the 2014 Biennial, Julie Ault selected as points of entry works by David Wojnarowicz (1954–1992) and Martin Wong (1946–1999) from the Whitney’s permanent collection, exhibiting them alongside artifacts from these artists’ personal archives, held by the Downtown Collection at New York University’s Fales Library.

    Marvin J. Taylor is an archiving activist and the director of the Fales Library and Special Collections at New York University. Read a conversation between Taylor and Ault, which is part of Ault’s contribution to the 2014 Biennial.

    Julie Ault, Afterlife: a constellation, 2014 (installation view, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York). Courtesy the artist

  14. Finishing touches! Installing the front window vinyl before the 2014 Biennial opens to the public today.

    Finishing touches! Installing the front window vinyl before the 2014 Biennial opens to the public today.

  15. Sheila Hicks’s cascading installation in the 2014 Biennial is made of acrylic, linen, cotton, bamboo, and silk. Experience it in person starting Friday.

    Sheila Hicks’s cascading installation in the 2014 Biennial is made of acrylic, linen, cotton, bamboo, and silk. Experience it in person starting Friday.