1. A look at the fourth floor of the 2014 Biennial, curated by Michelle Grabner.

  2. A look at the third floor of the 2014 Biennial, curated by Stuart Comer.

  3. Invited to assemble a “show within a show” for the 2014 Biennial, Julie Ault selected as points of entry works by David Wojnarowicz (1954–1992) and Martin Wong (1946–1999) from the Whitney’s permanent collection, exhibiting them alongside artifacts from these artists’ personal archives, held by the Downtown Collection at New York University’s Fales Library.
Marvin J. Taylor is an archiving activist and the director of the Fales Library and Special Collections at New York University. Read a conversation between Taylor and Ault, which is part of Ault’s contribution to the 2014 Biennial.
Julie Ault, Afterlife: a constellation, 2014 (installation view, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York). Courtesy the artist

    Invited to assemble a “show within a show” for the 2014 Biennial, Julie Ault selected as points of entry works by David Wojnarowicz (1954–1992) and Martin Wong (1946–1999) from the Whitney’s permanent collection, exhibiting them alongside artifacts from these artists’ personal archives, held by the Downtown Collection at New York University’s Fales Library.

    Marvin J. Taylor is an archiving activist and the director of the Fales Library and Special Collections at New York University. Read a conversation between Taylor and Ault, which is part of Ault’s contribution to the 2014 Biennial.

    Julie Ault, Afterlife: a constellation, 2014 (installation view, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York). Courtesy the artist

  4. Finishing touches! Installing the front window vinyl before the 2014 Biennial opens to the public today.

    Finishing touches! Installing the front window vinyl before the 2014 Biennial opens to the public today.

  5. Sheila Hicks’s cascading installation in the 2014 Biennial is made of acrylic, linen, cotton, bamboo, and silk. Experience it in person starting Friday.

    Sheila Hicks’s cascading installation in the 2014 Biennial is made of acrylic, linen, cotton, bamboo, and silk. Experience it in person starting Friday.

  6. Installation view of Edward Steichen in the 1920s and 1930s: A Recent Acquisition (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, December 6, 2013–February 23, 2014). Photograph by John Muggenborg

    Installation view of Edward Steichen in the 1920s and 1930s: A Recent Acquisition (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, December 6, 2013–February 23, 2014). Photograph by John Muggenborg

  7. T. J. Wilcox: In the Air—a panoramic film installation inspired by New York City—closes today!
Installation view of T. J. Wilcox: In the Air, 2013 (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, September 19, 2013–February 9, 2014). Photograph by Bill Orcutt

    T. J. Wilcox: In the Air—a panoramic film installation inspired by New York City—closes today!

    Installation view of T. J. Wilcox: In the Air, 2013 (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, September 19, 2013–February 9, 2014). Photograph by Bill Orcutt

  8. I wanted to make a film that could include … a sort of sense that I think we all have looking at New York City of seeing it in the present and past tense simultaneously.

    — T. J. Wilcox, whose panoramic film installation, In the Air closes tomorrow.

  9. CLOSING SOON! T. J. Wilcox’s panoramic film installation, In the Air, features breathtaking 360-degree views of Manhattan punctuated by six short films that tell stories inspired by the view from the artist’s studio high above Union Square.
T. J. Wilcox (b. 1965), still from In the Air, 2013. Panoramic film installation: Super 8 film transferred to video and HD video, black-and-white and color, silent; 35 min., looped. Collection of the artist; courtesy Metro Pictures. Image courtesy the artist

    CLOSING SOON! T. J. Wilcox’s panoramic film installation, In the Air, features breathtaking 360-degree views of Manhattan punctuated by six short films that tell stories inspired by the view from the artist’s studio high above Union Square.

    T. J. Wilcox (b. 1965), still from In the Air, 2013. Panoramic film installation: Super 8 film transferred to video and HD video, black-and-white and color, silent; 35 min., looped. Collection of the artist; courtesy Metro Pictures. Image courtesy the artist

  10. CLOSING SUNDAY! Celebrated by The New York Observer as “an essential show,” Rituals of Rented Island revisits 1970s Manhattan—a groundbreaking moment in the history of performance art—through installations, film and video, objects, photographs, and other ephemera.

  11. LAST WEEK! Don’t miss Rituals of Rented Island, which revisits 1970s New York—a groundbreaking moment in the history of performance art—through work by Vito Acconci, Laurie Anderson, and John Zorn, among others.
Installation view of Rituals of Rented Island: Object Theater, Loft Performance, and the New Psychodrama—Manhattan 1970-1980 (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, October 31, 2013–February 2, 2014). Photograph by Ron Amstutz

    LAST WEEK! Don’t miss Rituals of Rented Island, which revisits 1970s New York—a groundbreaking moment in the history of performance art—through work by Vito Acconci, Laurie Anderson, and John Zorn, among others.

    Installation view of Rituals of Rented Island: Object Theater, Loft Performance, and the New Psychodrama—Manhattan 1970-1980 (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, October 31, 2013–February 2, 2014). Photograph by Ron Amstutz

  12. FINAL WEEKS: A mesmerizing, multi-sensory experience, Rituals of Rented Island: Object Theater, Loft Performance, and the New Psychodrama—Manhattan, 1970–1980 revisits a pivotal moment in the history of performance art through installations, film and video, objects, photographs, and other ephemera.

  13. "One of the most mesmerizing temporary sights in town…not to be missed and maybe never to be forgotten." —New York Magazine on T. J. Wilcox: In the Air, on view through February 9. 
Installation view of T. J. Wilcox: In the Air, 2013 (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, September 19, 2013–February 9, 2014). Photograph by Bill Orcutt

    "One of the most mesmerizing temporary sights in town…not to be missed and maybe never to be forgotten." —New York Magazine on T. J. Wilcox: In the Air, on view through February 9. 

    Installation view of T. J. Wilcox: In the Air, 2013 (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, September 19, 2013–February 9, 2014). Photograph by Bill Orcutt

  14. Join us on January 23, as artists T. J. Wilcox and Anne Collier join curator Chrissie Iles for a discussion about Wilcox’s remarkable panoramic film installation, In the Air.
Installation view of T. J. Wilcox: In the Air, 2013 (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, September 19, 2013-February 9, 2014). Photograph by Bill Orcutt

    Join us on January 23, as artists T. J. Wilcox and Anne Collier join curator Chrissie Iles for a discussion about Wilcox’s remarkable panoramic film installation, In the Air.

    Installation view of T. J. Wilcox: In the Air, 2013 (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, September 19, 2013-February 9, 2014). Photograph by Bill Orcutt

  15. "One of the most important, most moving artworks ever made about New York." T. J. Wilcox: In the Air tops The New York Observer's list of best exhibitions of 2013.
Installation view of T. J. Wilcox: In the Air, 2013 (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, September 19, 2013-February 9, 2014). Photograph by Bill Orcutt

    "One of the most important, most moving artworks ever made about New York." T. J. Wilcox: In the Air tops The New York Observer's list of best exhibitions of 2013.

    Installation view of T. J. Wilcox: In the Air, 2013 (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, September 19, 2013-February 9, 2014). Photograph by Bill Orcutt