1. Cory Arcangel has been included in several exhibitions at the Whitney, among them the 2004 Biennial and his 2011 full-floor solo show, Pro Tools—both before the age of 35. In this Whitney Stories video, Arcangel speaks about his relationship to pop culture and avant-garde art, the complexities of working in the constantly-evolving realm of new media, and his history of taking risks at the Whitney.

  2. We’re thrilled to announce the relaunch of Douglas Davis’s The World’s First Collaborative Sentence (1994). Comprised of more than 200,000 posts in a dozen languages, the visionary work is a living document of the Internet’s evolution. View both a historical and a live version—to which visitors can contribute again for the first time in years—on whitney.org.Douglas Davis (b. 1933), The World’s First Collaborative Sentence, 1994–, conserved 2012. HTML and CGI script. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Barbara Schwartz in honor of Eugene M. Schwartz 95.253. Originally commissioned by the Lehman College Art Gallery, The City University of New York, with the assistance of Gary Welz, Robert Schneider, and Susan Hoeltzel

    We’re thrilled to announce the relaunch of Douglas Davis’s The World’s First Collaborative Sentence (1994). Comprised of more than 200,000 posts in a dozen languages, the visionary work is a living document of the Internet’s evolution. View both a historical and a live version—to which visitors can contribute again for the first time in years—on whitney.org.

    Douglas Davis (b. 1933), The World’s First Collaborative Sentence, 1994–, conserved 2012. HTML and CGI script. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Barbara Schwartz in honor of Eugene M. Schwartz 95.253. Originally commissioned by the Lehman College Art Gallery, The City University of New York, with the assistance of Gary Welz, Robert Schneider, and Susan Hoeltzel

  3. John Kelsey, Depesrsion, Impoetnce, 2012. 

    Kelsey repurposed found language from spam emails for these “poems,” which he presents on paper featuring the old Whitney Museum insignia, the eagle. The lists of names indicate the emails’ senders, the titles are drawn from the subject lines, and the “stanzas” consist of the seemingly random, cut and pasted content of the messages. 

    Bottom right photograph by Tyko