1. blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC, Whitney Biennial edition:  Biennial artist Paul Druecke collaborated with poet Donna Stonecipher  on this wall work, which sits by the little bridge that links the Whitney Museum to the rest of New York. It captures the language of commemorative plaques that we place here and there across most of our cities, as we testify to the histories that we live among and that risk being lost to us. (I recognize the “falconer” line from the plaque on a Victorian statue that I jog by in Central Park, and the “somber, heavy, and even brutal” passage is boilerplate that refers to the Whitney itself.) By providing a mash-up of so many separate commemorations, Druecke and Stonecipher distill out a poignant, generalized sense of our efforts to preserve memories. When we put up any plaque, they seem to be saying, the act of erecting it matters as much as the information it bears. This Whitney work, you could say, is a plaque that commemorates all our other plaques. (Photo by Lucy Hogg)
The Daily Pic also appears at blogs.artinfo.com/the-daily-pic. For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.

    blakegopnik:

    THE DAILY PIC, Whitney Biennial edition:  Biennial artist Paul Druecke collaborated with poet Donna Stonecipher  on this wall work, which sits by the little bridge that links the Whitney Museum to the rest of New York. It captures the language of commemorative plaques that we place here and there across most of our cities, as we testify to the histories that we live among and that risk being lost to us. (I recognize the “falconer” line from the plaque on a Victorian statue that I jog by in Central Park, and the “somber, heavy, and even brutal” passage is boilerplate that refers to the Whitney itself.) By providing a mash-up of so many separate commemorations, Druecke and Stonecipher distill out a poignant, generalized sense of our efforts to preserve memories. When we put up any plaque, they seem to be saying, the act of erecting it matters as much as the information it bears. This Whitney work, you could say, is a plaque that commemorates all our other plaques. (Photo by Lucy Hogg)

    The Daily Pic also appears at blogs.artinfo.com/the-daily-pic. For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.

  2. Artists Emily Sundblad and Sara Greenberger Rafferty posed in front of the Museum’s iconic windows for the latest issue of New York Magazine. See their work when the Biennial opens March 7.

    Artists Emily Sundblad and Sara Greenberger Rafferty posed in front of the Museum’s iconic windows for the latest issue of New York Magazine. See their work when the Biennial opens March 7.

  3. Happy birthday to our founder, Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, who was born today in 1875.
Robert Henri (1865–1929), Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, 1916. Oil on canvas, 50 × 72 in. (127 × 182.9 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Flora Whitney Miller 86.70.3 © Estate of Robert Henri

    Happy birthday to our founderGertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, who was born today in 1875.

    Robert Henri (1865–1929), Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, 1916. Oil on canvas, 50 × 72 in. (127 × 182.9 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Flora Whitney Miller 86.70.3 © Estate of Robert Henri

  4. Give the gift that lasts all year long! Share the Whitney with family and friends with a gift of membership. Your loved one will be among the first to see the 2014 Biennial and this summer’s Jeff Koons retrospective.

    Give the gift that lasts all year long! Share the Whitney with family and friends with a gift of membership. Your loved one will be among the first to see the 2014 Biennial and this summer’s Jeff Koons retrospective.

  5. Today is your last Sunday morning to spend at Hopper Drawing! Closing today, the exhibition presents Edward Hopper’s most celebrated paintings—including Nighthawks and New York Movie—alongside the drawings that inspired them.
Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Early Sunday Morning, 1930. Oil on canvas, 35 3/16 × 60 1/4 in. (89.4 × 153 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase with funds from Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney 31.426. © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by the Whitney Museum of American Art. Digital image © Whitney Museum of American Art

    Today is your last Sunday morning to spend at Hopper Drawing! Closing today, the exhibition presents Edward Hopper’s most celebrated paintings—including Nighthawks and New York Movie—alongside the drawings that inspired them.

    Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Early Sunday Morning, 1930. Oil on canvas, 35 3/16 × 60 1/4 in. (89.4 × 153 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase with funds from Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney 31.426. © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by the Whitney Museum of American Art. Digital image © Whitney Museum of American Art

  6. T. J. Wilcox: In the Air, a new panoramic film installation, opens today! Six films, shot from the artist’s studio high above Union Square, tell New York–specific narratives related to the spectacular views from Wilcox’s windows. 
T. J. Wilcox (b. 1965), still from In the Air, 2013. Panoramic film installation: Super 8 film transferred to video and HD video, black-and-white and color, silent; 35 min., looped. Collection of the artist; courtesy Metro Pictures. Image courtesy the artist

    T. J. Wilcox: In the Air, a new panoramic film installation, opens today! Six films, shot from the artist’s studio high above Union Square, tell New York–specific narratives related to the spectacular views from Wilcox’s windows. 

    T. J. Wilcox (b. 1965), still from In the Air, 2013. Panoramic film installation: Super 8 film transferred to video and HD video, black-and-white and color, silent; 35 min., looped. Collection of the artist; courtesy Metro Pictures. Image courtesy the artist

  7. We remember September 11 with an image of Robert Irwin’s Line Rectangle, World Trade Center, New York from the artist’s 1977 Whitney retrospective catalogue. For the work, Irwin used a black cable to articulate the rectangle between two buildings of the World Trade Center complex.

    We remember September 11 with an image of Robert Irwin’s Line Rectangle, World Trade Center, New York from the artist’s 1977 Whitney retrospective catalogue. For the work, Irwin used a black cable to articulate the rectangle between two buildings of the World Trade Center complex.

  8. If you could say it in words, there would be no reason to paint.

    — 

    Edward Hopper

    On this day in 1882, Edward Hopper was born in Nyack, New York. 

  9. First published in conjunction with Robert Irwin’s 1977 retrospective at the Whitney, the original exhibition catalogue has been digitized to coincide with the reinstallation of Scrim veil—Black rectangle—Natural light, Whitney Museum of American Art (1977) now on view on the fourth floor of the Museum. Whether you’ve already seen the exhibition or are planning a visit soon, it’s a must-read. 

    First published in conjunction with Robert Irwin’s 1977 retrospective at the Whitney, the original exhibition catalogue has been digitized to coincide with the reinstallation of Scrim veil—Black rectangle—Natural light, Whitney Museum of American Art (1977) now on view on the fourth floor of the Museum. Whether you’ve already seen the exhibition or are planning a visit soon, it’s a must-read. 

  10. Jay DeFeo: A Retrospective closes this Sunday. Don’t miss your chance to see this definitive exhibition of the artist’s work, including her monumental painting—The Rose.
Jay DeFeo (1929–1989), Reflections of Africa No. 8, 1989. Charcoal and graphite on paper, 11 5/8 × 17 1/8 in. (29.5 × 43.5 cm). The Jay DeFeo Trust, Berkeley. © 2013 The Jay DeFeo Trust / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photograph by Ben Blackwell

    Jay DeFeo: A Retrospective closes this Sunday. Don’t miss your chance to see this definitive exhibition of the artist’s work, including her monumental painting—The Rose.

    Jay DeFeo (1929–1989), Reflections of Africa No. 8, 1989. Charcoal and graphite on paper, 11 5/8 × 17 1/8 in. (29.5 × 43.5 cm). The Jay DeFeo Trust, Berkeley. © 2013 The Jay DeFeo Trust / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photograph by Ben Blackwell

  11. Hopper Drawing opens today! The first major museum exhibition to focus on the drawings and creative process of Edward Hopper, this survey pairs many of the artist’s greatest oil paintings, including Early Sunday Morning (1930), New York Movie (1939), Office at Night (1940) and Nighthawks (1942), with their preparatory drawings and related works.
Top: Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Study for Nighthawks, 1941 or 1942. Fabricated chalk and charcoal on paper; 11 1/8 × 15 in. (28.3 × 38.1 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase and gift of Josephine N. Hopper by exchange 2011.65; Bottom: Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Nighthawks, 1942. Oil on canvas, 33 1/8 x 60 in. (84.1 x 152.4 cm). The Art Institute of Chicago; Friends of American Art Collection. © The Art Institute of Chicago. 

    Hopper Drawing opens today! The first major museum exhibition to focus on the drawings and creative process of Edward Hopper, this survey pairs many of the artist’s greatest oil paintings, including Early Sunday Morning (1930), New York Movie (1939), Office at Night (1940) and Nighthawks (1942), with their preparatory drawings and related works.

    Top: Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Study for Nighthawks, 1941 or 1942. Fabricated chalk and charcoal on paper; 11 1/8 × 15 in. (28.3 × 38.1 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase and gift of Josephine N. Hopper by exchange 2011.65; Bottom: Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Nighthawks, 1942. Oil on canvas, 33 1/8 x 60 in. (84.1 x 152.4 cm). The Art Institute of Chicago; Friends of American Art Collection. © The Art Institute of Chicago. 

  12. Join us this Friday evening as artist Nate Lowman presents a live action painting performance as an homage to Jay DeFeo. Taking inspiration from the time-honored tradition of copying paintings in museums, Lowman will replicate a work currently on view in Jay DeFeo: A Retrospective, while opening up his own studio practice to the public. Admission is free during pay-what-you-wish. 
Above, watch Lowman speak with curator Chrissie Iles about his reinterpretation of another artist’s work: Yoko Ono’s Painting to Be Stepped On (1960). 

    Join us this Friday evening as artist Nate Lowman presents a live action painting performance as an homage to Jay DeFeo. Taking inspiration from the time-honored tradition of copying paintings in museums, Lowman will replicate a work currently on view in Jay DeFeo: A Retrospective, while opening up his own studio practice to the public. Admission is free during pay-what-you-wish.

    Above, watch Lowman speak with curator Chrissie Iles about his reinterpretation of another artist’s work: Yoko Ono’s Painting to Be Stepped On (1960). 

  13. The Installation of The Rose from an Art Handler’s PerspectiveBy Graham Miles, Whitney art handler Documented by Paula Court, photographer XI. “This is the view from inside the wall behind The Rose. Looking out through the hole you can make out back of The Rose and one of the three feet that support the weight of the painting.”Jay DeFeo: A Retrospective is on view now through June 2. 

    The Installation of The Rose from an Art Handler’s Perspective
    By Graham Miles, Whitney art handler 
    Documented by Paula Court, photographer 

    XI. “This is the view from inside the wall behind The Rose. Looking out through the hole you can make out back of The Rose and one of the three feet that support the weight of the painting.”

    Jay DeFeo: A Retrospective is on view now through June 2. 

  14. The Installation of The Rose from an Art Handler’s PerspectiveBy Graham Miles, Whitney art handler Documented by Paula Court, photographer X. “Minor adjustments are made so that the bolts can be slid into position. It’s pretty dark back there, so a flashlight is helpful.”Jay DeFeo: A Retrospective is on view now through June 2. 

    The Installation of The Rose from an Art Handler’s Perspective
    By Graham Miles, Whitney art handler 
    Documented by Paula Court, photographer 

    X. “Minor adjustments are made so that the bolts can be slid into position. It’s pretty dark back there, so a flashlight is helpful.”

    Jay DeFeo: A Retrospective is on view now through June 2. 

  15. The Installation of The Rose from an Art Handler’s PerspectiveBy Graham Miles, Whitney art handler Documented by Paula Court, photographer VIII. “Now that The Rose is close to vertical, you can see the legs of the gantry are pushed back beyond the exterior sheetrock and into the recesses of the wall on either side of the painting. Without these holes the gantry would end up two feet away from the wall, complicating the transition from the gantry to the steel cleat.”Jay DeFeo: A Retrospective is on view now through June 2. 

    The Installation of The Rose from an Art Handler’s Perspective
    By Graham Miles, Whitney art handler 
    Documented by Paula Court, photographer 

    VIII. “Now that The Rose is close to vertical, you can see the legs of the gantry are pushed back beyond the exterior sheetrock and into the recesses of the wall on either side of the painting. Without these holes the gantry would end up two feet away from the wall, complicating the transition from the gantry to the steel cleat.”

    Jay DeFeo: A Retrospective is on view now through June 2.