1. “Art has this ability to allow you to connect back through history in the same way that biology does. I’m always looking for source material.” —Jeff Koons
Installation view Jeff Koons: A Retrospective (June 27–October 19, 2014), Whitney Museum of American Art, N.Y. © Jeff Koons. Photograph by Ron Amstutz

    “Art has this ability to allow you to connect back through history in the same way that biology does. I’m always looking for source material.” —Jeff Koons

    Installation view Jeff Koons: A Retrospective (June 27–October 19, 2014), Whitney Museum of American Art, N.Y. © Jeff Koons. Photograph by Ron Amstutz

  2. Planning to attend Jeff Koons: A Retrospective? Listen to the audio guide, featuring commentary by Jeff Koons and curator Scott Rothkopf, among others.
Installation view Jeff Koons: A Retrospective (June 27–October 19, 2014) Whitney Museum of American Art, N.Y. © Jeff Koons. Photograph by Ron Amstutz

    Planning to attend Jeff Koons: A Retrospective? Listen to the audio guide, featuring commentary by Jeff Koons and curator Scott Rothkopf, among others.

    Installation view Jeff Koons: A Retrospective (June 27–October 19, 2014) Whitney Museum of American Art, N.Y. © Jeff Koons. Photograph by Ron Amstutz

  3. Today, the two artists with whom the Whitney has been most closely identified were born: Edward Hopper in 1882 and Alexander Calder in 1898. You can see their work on the fifth-floor mezzanine. 

    Today, the two artists with whom the Whitney has been most closely identified were born: Edward Hopper in 1882 and Alexander Calder in 1898. You can see their work on the fifth-floor mezzanine

  4. Teens are invited to explore Jeff Koons: A Retrospective during a free event tomorrow. More info on whitney.org.
Jeff Koons (b. 1955), Olive Oyl, 2003. Oil on canvas; 108 × 84 in. (274.3 × 213.4 cm). Private collection. © Jeff Koons

    Teens are invited to explore Jeff Koons: A Retrospective during a free event tomorrow. More info on whitney.org.

    Jeff Koons (b. 1955), Olive Oyl, 2003. Oil on canvas; 108 × 84 in. (274.3 × 213.4 cm). Private collection. © Jeff Koons

  5. Photography is nature seen from the eyes outward, painting from the eyes inward.

    — Charles Sheeler, born today in 1883.

  6. What an artist is trying to do for people is to bring them closer to something, because art is about sharing: you wouldn’t be an artist unless you wanted to share an experience, a thought.

    — David Hockney, born today in 1937.

  7. The Museum is closed today, but you can still get a sneak peek at Jeff Koons: A Retrospective. Here’s the monumental painting, Tulips (1995–98), which is hanging over our restaurant. 

    The Museum is closed today, but you can still get a sneak peek at Jeff Koons: A Retrospective. Here’s the monumental painting, Tulips (1995–98), which is hanging over our restaurant. 

  8. FINAL WEEKEND! American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe closes Sunday. 

    FINAL WEEKEND! American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe closes Sunday. 

  9. The finalists have been announced and eleven works from the Whitney’s collection will appear in Art Everywhere U.S., the initiative that will transform billboards, bus shelters, subway platforms, and more into a free, open-air art gallery across the country. Look for them this August!

  10. We’re excited to partner with our new neighbors at the High Line on a public art series. Alex Katz's Katherine and Elizabeth will be the inaugural installation on the north-facing wall of 95 Horatio Street at the southern end of the High Line adjacent to the new building. 
Read more on ArtReview and look for it in the coming weeks! 

    We’re excited to partner with our new neighbors at the High Line on a public art series. Alex Katz's Katherine and Elizabeth will be the inaugural installation on the north-facing wall of 95 Horatio Street at the southern end of the High Line adjacent to the new building

    Read more on ArtReview and look for it in the coming weeks! 

  11. vanityfair:

Has Jeff Koons, taboo-busting rebel, become a pillar of the art establishment? 
Photograph by Annie Leibovitz.

    vanityfair:

    Has Jeff Koons, taboo-busting rebel, become a pillar of the art establishment?

    Photograph by Annie Leibovitz.

  12. A lovely reminder from hwanlee that sketching with pencil is allowed in the Whitney's galleries.

  13. Actual space is intrinsically more powerful and specific than paint on a flat surface.

    — Donald Judd, born today in 1928.

  14. Jeff Koons: A Retrospective, opening June 27, is featured in The New Yorker's summer preview.
Jeff Koons (b. 1955), Split-Rocker (Orange/Red), 1999. Polychromed aluminum; 13 1/2 × 14 1/2 × 13 in. (34.3 × 36.8 × 33 cm). B. Z. and Michael Schwartz. © Jeff Koons

    Jeff Koons: A Retrospective, opening June 27, is featured in The New Yorker's summer preview.

    Jeff Koons (b. 1955), Split-Rocker (Orange/Red), 1999. Polychromed aluminum; 13 1/2 × 14 1/2 × 13 in. (34.3 × 36.8 × 33 cm). B. Z. and Michael Schwartz. © Jeff Koons

  15. lacma:

What if billboards advertised art instead of stuff you don’t need? http://bit.ly/1rdYRVF via Fast Company ‪

“I have this image of driving on Route 66 in a convertible and seeing a Georgia O’Keeffe billboard.” —Jeff Levine, the Whitney’s chief marketing and communications officer.

    lacma:

    What if billboards advertised art instead of stuff you don’t need? http://bit.ly/1rdYRVF via Fast Company ‪

    “I have this image of driving on Route 66 in a convertible and seeing a Georgia O’Keeffe billboard.” —Jeff Levine, the Whitney’s chief marketing and communications officer.