1. picturesaboutbuildingsandpeople:

"New York Interior" by Edward Hopper. (The last picture I saw at the Whitney on its last day on Madison Avenue.) 

    picturesaboutbuildingsandpeople:

    "New York Interior" by Edward Hopper. (The last picture I saw at the Whitney on its last day on Madison Avenue.) 

  2. Hopper light / Breuer light

    Hopper light / Breuer light

  3. Admiring Jeff Koons's Cake (1995–97).
Photograph by goldenshowersss.

    Admiring Jeff Koons's Cake (1995–97).

    Photograph by goldenshowersss.

  4. Jeff Koons is widely regarded as one of the most important, influential, popular, and controversial artists of the postwar era. In this Whitney Stories video, Koons reflects upon the significance of having his first retrospective at the Whitney at age 59, and discusses the manifesto that drives his work.

  5. Artist Todd Hido looks at A Woman in the Sun (1961), which is installed alongside his photograph #1922-C (1997) in Edward Hopper and Photography.

    Artist Todd Hido looks at A Woman in the Sun (1961), which is installed alongside his photograph #1922-C (1997) in Edward Hopper and Photography.

  6. Helen Frankenthaler's Blue Form in a Scene (1961) and Grace Hartigan's Sweden (1959) in Shaping a Collection: Five Decades of Gifts.
Photograph via heatherripleyart.

    Helen Frankenthaler's Blue Form in a Scene (1961) and Grace Hartigan's Sweden (1959) in Shaping a Collection: Five Decades of Gifts.

    Photograph via heatherripleyart.

  7. "A painting is not a picture of an experience; it is an experience." —Mark Rothko, born today in 1903. 
Photo via crabmink.

    "A painting is not a picture of an experience; it is an experience." —Mark Rothko, born today in 1903. 

    Photo via crabmink.

  8. For this painting, Koons intended the two images of the Playboy playmates on its surface to refer to Andy Warhol’s work Double Elvis.
Jeff Koons (b. 1955), Elvis, 2003. Oil on canvas; 108 × 93 in. (274.3 × 236.2 cm). Stefan T. Edlis Collection © Jeff Koons

    For this painting, Koons intended the two images of the Playboy playmates on its surface to refer to Andy Warhol’s work Double Elvis.

    Jeff Koons (b. 1955), Elvis, 2003. Oil on canvas; 108 × 93 in. (274.3 × 236.2 cm). Stefan T. Edlis Collection © Jeff Koons

  9. Perfect for a rainy, late summer day: Pat Steir’s September Evening Waterfall (1991). 

    Perfect for a rainy, late summer day: Pat Steir’s September Evening Waterfall (1991). 

  10. A look at the fourth floor galleries of Jeff Koons: A Retrospective.

  11. When the nearly ten-foot-wide Four Darks in Red (1958) is seen close up as Mark Rothko intended, viewers are engulfed in an atmosphere of color.

    When the nearly ten-foot-wide Four Darks in Red (1958) is seen close up as Mark Rothko intended, viewers are engulfed in an atmosphere of color.

  12. Art Everywhere U.S. continues through August—keep your eyes peeled for works from our collection!

  13. Visiting Jeff Koons: A Retrospective? Listen to the audio guide, featuring commentary by the artist and curator Scott Rothkopf, among others.
Installation view Jeff Koons: A Retrospective (June 27–October 19, 2014) Whitney Museum of American Art, N.Y. © Jeff Koons. Photograph by Ron Amstutz

    Visiting Jeff Koons: A Retrospective? Listen to the audio guide, featuring commentary by the artist and curator Scott Rothkopf, among others.

    Installation view Jeff Koons: A Retrospective (June 27–October 19, 2014) Whitney Museum of American Art, N.Y. © Jeff Koons. Photograph by Ron Amstutz

  14. A look at the third floor galleries of Jeff Koons: A Retrospective.

  15. This puzzle features Jeff Koons’s painting Loopy (1999) from the Easyfun series. Preorder now for a September delivery.

    This puzzle features Jeff Koons’s painting Loopy (1999) from the Easyfun series. Preorder now for a September delivery.