1. In celebration of Earth Day, here’s Georgia O’Keeffe’s Summer Days, which was inspired by the deserts of New Mexico. Cast your vote now for the chance to see Summer Days in the great outdoors as part of Art Everywhere US.
Georgia O’Keeffe (1887–1986), Summer Days, 1936. Oil on canvas, 36 × 30 in. (91.4 × 76.2 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Calvin Klein 94.171. © 2014 Georgia O’Keeffe Museum / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

    In celebration of Earth Day, here’s Georgia O’Keeffe’s Summer Days, which was inspired by the deserts of New Mexico. Cast your vote now for the chance to see Summer Days in the great outdoors as part of Art Everywhere US.

    Georgia O’Keeffe (1887–1986), Summer Days, 1936. Oil on canvas, 36 × 30 in. (91.4 × 76.2 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Calvin Klein 94.171. © 2014 Georgia O’Keeffe Museum / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

  2. "When color becomes material, I’m really interested in that … When you put a bunch of string into a mess of paint, and the string takes on the color, the canvas also takes the color in unpredictable ways." —Dona Nelson talks about making String Beings (2013).

    Want to hear more from artists in the 2014 Biennial? Pick up a free Whitney Guide in the Lobby, a Windows Phone app featuring interviews with artists, commentary from the curators, and a tour for kids.

  3. A look at the fourth floor of the 2014 Biennial, curated by Michelle Grabner.

  4. A look at the third floor of the 2014 Biennial, curated by Stuart Comer.

  5. From Marsden Hartley to Cindy Sherman, there’s something for everyone in Art Everywhere USCast your vote now and tell us which iconic American artworks you want to see on billboards, trains, and buses across the country—including twenty from the Whitney’s permanent collection.

  6. A look at the second floor of the 2014 Biennial, curated by Anthony Elms. 

  7. For the first Biennial, artists—among them Grant Wood, Arshile Gorky, and Georgia O’Keeffe—were invited to submit works of their own choosing, continuing the tradition of nonjuried exhibitions surveying new American art which began at the Whitney Studio Club in 1918.
Installation view of the First Biennial Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting, November 23, 1932–January 5, 1933, Whitney Museum of American Art

    For the first Biennial, artists—among them Grant Wood, Arshile Gorky, and Georgia O’Keeffe—were invited to submit works of their own choosing, continuing the tradition of nonjuried exhibitions surveying new American art which began at the Whitney Studio Club in 1918.

    Installation view of the First Biennial Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting, November 23, 1932–January 5, 1933, Whitney Museum of American Art

  8. “When in doubt, spray paint it gold.” —Rebecca Morris in her manifesto, For Abstractionists and Friends of the Non-Objective, a tongue-in-cheek yet absolutely sincere call to arms for practitioners of the form. See her work on the second floor of the Biennial.

    “When in doubt, spray paint it gold.” —Rebecca Morris in her manifesto, For Abstractionists and Friends of the Non-Objective, a tongue-in-cheek yet absolutely sincere call to arms for practitioners of the form. See her work on the second floor of the Biennial.

  9. When I think of art I think of beauty. Beauty is the mystery of life. It is not in the eye, it is in the mind.

    — Agnes Martin, born on this day in 1912.

  10. Happy first day of spring!
Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Le Pavillon de Flore in the Spring, 1907. Oil on canvas. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest. © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by Whitney Museum of American Art

    Happy first day of spring!

    Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Le Pavillon de Flore in the Spring, 1907. Oil on canvas. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest. © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by Whitney Museum of American Art

  11. For David Diao's 40 Years of His Art, one of his paintings on view in the 2014 Biennial, the artist created a fake invitation ostensibly from the Museum of Modern Art’s Board of Trustees for a reception celebrating a fictitious Diao retrospective. The design is copied from a 1939 invitation to the Trustees’ reception for Pablo Picasso: 40 Years of His Art.
David Diao (b. 1943), 40 Years of His Art, 2013. Acrylic and vinyl on canvas, 40 × 60 in. (101.5 × 153 cm). Collection of the artist; courtesy Postmasters Gallery, New York. © David Diao

    For David Diao's 40 Years of His Art, one of his paintings on view in the 2014 Biennial, the artist created a fake invitation ostensibly from the Museum of Modern Art’s Board of Trustees for a reception celebrating a fictitious Diao retrospective. The design is copied from a 1939 invitation to the Trustees’ reception for Pablo Picasso: 40 Years of His Art.

    David Diao (b. 1943), 40 Years of His Art, 2013. Acrylic and vinyl on canvas, 40 × 60 in. (101.5 × 153 cm). Collection of the artist; courtesy Postmasters Gallery, New York. © David Diao

  12. Behind-the-scenes look at the planning of Jeff Koons: A Retrospective. The exhibition, which will fill nearly the entirety of the Whitney’s Marcel Breuer building, opens June 27. 

    Behind-the-scenes look at the planning of Jeff Koons: A Retrospective. The exhibition, which will fill nearly the entirety of the Whitney’s Marcel Breuer building, opens June 27. 

  13. Words are becoming as legitimate as the more traditional subject matter of painting, drawing, video, and sculpture.

    — The Millions on writing in the 2014 Biennial.

  14. #AmericanArtIs an ongoing conversation. The 2014 Biennial is up for debate. Love it? Hate it? Have your say. 

    #AmericanArtIs an ongoing conversation. The 2014 Biennial is up for debate. Love it? Hate it? Have your say. 

  15. The New York Times previews the 2014 Biennial, highlighting some of the themes—nostalgia, women revitalizing abstract painting, architecture, and more—that figure prominently in the seventy-seventh edition of the Museum’s signature exhibition.
Laura Owens (b. 1970), Untitled, 2013 (detail). Oil, Flashe, acrylic, bike wheels, training wheels, wagon wheels, and tricycle wheel on linen, 108 × 84 in. (274.3 × 213.4 cm), Private collection; courtesy the artist and Gavin Brown’s enterprise, New York. Photograph by Tom Powel

    The New York Times previews the 2014 Biennial, highlighting some of the themes—nostalgia, women revitalizing abstract painting, architecture, and more—that figure prominently in the seventy-seventh edition of the Museum’s signature exhibition.

    Laura Owens (b. 1970), Untitled, 2013 (detail). Oil, Flashe, acrylic, bike wheels, training wheels, wagon wheels, and tricycle wheel on linen, 108 × 84 in. (274.3 × 213.4 cm), Private collection; courtesy the artist and Gavin Brown’s enterprise, New York. Photograph by Tom Powel