1. How are artworks altered through the creation of facsimiles? This Saturday, poet Caroline Bergvall, scholar Lisa Gitelman, and artist William Pope.L respond to this question, facilitated by Triple Canopy editors. Get your tickets now. 
Triple Canopy, Pointing Machines I (Chestertown, Maryland), 2013. Pigmented inkjet print, 22 1/2 × 15 in. (57.2 × 38.1 cm). Collection of Triple Canopy

    How are artworks altered through the creation of facsimiles? This Saturday, poet Caroline Bergvall, scholar Lisa Gitelman, and artist William Pope.L respond to this question, facilitated by Triple Canopy editors. Get your tickets now. 

    Triple Canopy, Pointing Machines I (Chestertown, Maryland), 2013. Pigmented inkjet print, 22 1/2 × 15 in. (57.2 × 38.1 cm). Collection of Triple Canopy

  2. I found myself with 15 years of Western painting and art history studies under my belt, but suddenly realized that my own autobiography was more important to me than the 400 years of Western painting history that I had learned. I urgently wanted to figure out a way to abandon that conceptual sphere and to find something concrete that mattered to me.

    — 2014 Biennial artist Jacolby Satterwhite (via blackcontemporaryart)

  3. As part of the Biennial, Miguel Gutierrez will perform a duet with young dancer Mickey Mahar entitled Age & Beauty Part 1: Mid-Career Artist/Suicide Note or &:-/. The piece deals with mid-career anxiety, futurity, and tropes about the aging gay choreographer, and is the first of a three-part series of queer pieces addressing longevity, sustainability, aesthetic signature, and burnout. Get tickets.

  4. For over four decades, Channa Horwitz produced works using a rigid formal vocabulary of her devising, built on a standardized grid and a system of notations based on the numbers 1 through 8, each assigned its own color. Horwitz developed the system as a way of marking and expressing time, movement, and rhythm.

    For over four decades, Channa Horwitz produced works using a rigid formal vocabulary of her devising, built on a standardized grid and a system of notations based on the numbers 1 through 8, each assigned its own color. Horwitz developed the system as a way of marking and expressing time, movement, and rhythm.

  5. The Biennial is bustling this weekend. Today, catch My Barbarian’s final performance, screenings by Sensory Ethnography Lab, or join a docent-led gallery tour.

    The Biennial is bustling this weekend. Today, catch My Barbarian’s final performance, screenings by Sensory Ethnography Lab, or join a docent-led gallery tour.

  6. As part of the Biennial, My Barbarian is performing The Mother and Other Plays, an adaptation of Bertolt Brecht’s The Mother, including musical numbers, improvised content, and audience participation. See it today and tomorrow at 4:30 pm. 

    As part of the Biennial, My Barbarian is performing The Mother and Other Plays, an adaptation of Bertolt Brecht’s The Mother, including musical numbers, improvised content, and audience participation. See it today and tomorrow at 4:30 pm. 

  7. 2014 Biennial artists Zackary Drucker and Rhys Ernst visit the apartment of drag performance icon Flawless Sabrina, who features in Drucker and Ernst’s video She Gone Rogue. Flawless Sabrina performs a tarot reading for Drucker and the two discuss the pitfalls of success. 

    As part of the Biennial, Flawless Sabrina will hold tarot card readings at her apartment the weeks of March 24–April 13. Visit the project’s ticketing site to schedule an appointment.

  8. In this video from 2010, artist Dennis Oppenheim discusses the aggressive and rhythmic quality of the four-screen film installation, Echo (1974), as well as its relationship to body art.

    You can see Oppenheim’s Projects (1973), a portfolio of ten prints, through Sunday in In Parts.

  9. In Sarah Michelson's 4—the culmination of her Devotion series—the choreographer continued to explore the dialogue between the form and history of dance through intense physicality, rigorous formal structures, and precise staging.

  10. The groundhog’s shadow isn’t the only one on view today. Check out Ken Jacobs’s 3-D shadow-play in Rituals of Rented Island: Object Theater, Loft Performance, and the New Psychodrama—Manhattan, 1970–1980, closing today.
Ken Jacobs, "Slow is Beauty”—Rodin, Idea Warehouse, November 1974. Courtesy the artist. Photograph by J. F. Brown

    The groundhog’s shadow isn’t the only one on view today. Check out Ken Jacobs’s 3-D shadow-play in Rituals of Rented Island: Object Theater, Loft Performance, and the New Psychodrama—Manhattan, 1970–1980, closing today.

    Ken Jacobs, "Slow is Beauty”—Rodin, Idea Warehouse, November 1974. Courtesy the artist. Photograph by J. F. Brown

  11. CLOSING SUNDAY! Celebrated by The New York Observer as “an essential show,” Rituals of Rented Island revisits 1970s Manhattan—a groundbreaking moment in the history of performance art—through installations, film and video, objects, photographs, and other ephemera.

  12. Vito Acconci discusses Untitled Project for Pier 17, a performance that took place in 1971 near the site of the future Whitney.

    See Acconci’s work in Rituals of Rented Island: Object Theater, Loft Performance, and the New Psychodrama—Manhattan, 1970–1980 through Sunday.

  13. LAST WEEK! Don’t miss Rituals of Rented Island, which revisits 1970s New York—a groundbreaking moment in the history of performance art—through work by Vito Acconci, Laurie Anderson, and John Zorn, among others.
Installation view of Rituals of Rented Island: Object Theater, Loft Performance, and the New Psychodrama—Manhattan 1970-1980 (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, October 31, 2013–February 2, 2014). Photograph by Ron Amstutz

    LAST WEEK! Don’t miss Rituals of Rented Island, which revisits 1970s New York—a groundbreaking moment in the history of performance art—through work by Vito Acconci, Laurie Anderson, and John Zorn, among others.

    Installation view of Rituals of Rented Island: Object Theater, Loft Performance, and the New Psychodrama—Manhattan 1970-1980 (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, October 31, 2013–February 2, 2014). Photograph by Ron Amstutz

  14. I need to go to a place where I don’t know what’s happening, because that place is where the work is.

    — Sarah Michelson talks to Time Out New York about her latest dance, 4, which premiered at the Whitney last week. 

  15. Happy birthday to Vito Acconci, born today in 1940. In this video, Acconci discusses his performance project Security Zone (1971), which took place at New York City’s Pier 18, near the site of the future Whitney.

    See Acconci’s work in Rituals of Rented Island: Object Theater, Loft Performance, and the New Psychodrama—Manhattan, 1970–1980 through February 2.