1. A look at the third floor of the 2014 Biennial, curated by Stuart Comer.

  2. Got a minute? Watch two years of construction on the Whitney’s new building in just under 60 seconds. 

  3. During the nearly fifteen years that Vincent Punch has been a guard at the Whitney, he has seen myriad exhibitions, snapped countless candid photos, and developed a distinct eye for spontaneous visual arrangements that take place every day in the galleries. In this Whitney Stories video, he shares his observations on working as a guard, and offers his unique perspective on the Whitney and its future.

  4. #AmericanArtIs an ongoing conversation. The 2014 Biennial is up for debate. Love it? Hate it? Have your say. 

    #AmericanArtIs an ongoing conversation. The 2014 Biennial is up for debate. Love it? Hate it? Have your say. 

  5. Next Wednesday, Biennial artist Zoe Leonard invites visitors to take part in a seminar in her installation on the fourth floor. This lecture will engage Leonard’s interest in the act of looking as not only an optical process, but as a temporal, spatial, and social experience. Register online.
Zoe Leonard, 945 Madison Avenue, 2014 (installation view, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York). Collection of the artist; courtesy Murray Guy, New York; Galleria Raffaella Cortese, Milan; and Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne

    Next Wednesday, Biennial artist Zoe Leonard invites visitors to take part in a seminar in her installation on the fourth floor. This lecture will engage Leonard’s interest in the act of looking as not only an optical process, but as a temporal, spatial, and social experience. Register online.

    Zoe Leonard, 945 Madison Avenue, 2014 (installation view, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York). Collection of the artist; courtesy Murray Guy, New York; Galleria Raffaella Cortese, Milan; and Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne

  6. #AmericanArtIs UP FOR DEBATE. The 2014 Biennial is on view now. See it today and tell us what you think. 

    #AmericanArtIs UP FOR DEBATE. The 2014 Biennial is on view now. See it today and tell us what you think. 

  7. Don’t miss Edward Steichen in the 1920s and 1930s: A Recent Acquisition, on view through Sunday. The exhibition features more than forty works by the “godfather of modern fashion photography” (Gotham).

  8. Edward Steichen in the 1920s and 1930s: A Recent Acquisition is on view through February 23. Don’t miss it! 
blakegopnik:

DAILY PIC: The great photographer Edward Steichen did this product shot for Gorham Silver in 1929, and it’s now in the show of early Steichens recently acquired by the Whitney Museum in New York. The modest image has a wonderful modernist clarity and rigor. More than that, though, it gives visual confirmation of a general sense we have that modernist style in art was built on a scaffolding of modern forms of industry and commerce.  (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, gift of Richard and Jackie Hollander in memory of Ellyn Hollander; © 2014 The Estate of Edward Steichen /  Artists Rights Society (ARS), N.Y.)

    Edward Steichen in the 1920s and 1930s: A Recent Acquisition is on view through February 23. Don’t miss it! 

    blakegopnik:

    DAILY PIC: The great photographer Edward Steichen did this product shot for Gorham Silver in 1929, and it’s now in the show of early Steichens recently acquired by the Whitney Museum in New York. The modest image has a wonderful modernist clarity and rigor. More than that, though, it gives visual confirmation of a general sense we have that modernist style in art was built on a scaffolding of modern forms of industry and commerce.  (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, gift of Richard and Jackie Hollander in memory of Ellyn Hollander; © 2014 The Estate of Edward Steichen /  Artists Rights Society (ARS), N.Y.)

  9. In Sarah Michelson's 4—the culmination of her Devotion series—the choreographer continued to explore the dialogue between the form and history of dance through intense physicality, rigorous formal structures, and precise staging.

  10. Jay Sanders and J. Hoberman explore the vibrant underground performance art scene of 1970s New York in the exhibition catalogue for Rituals of Rented Island. Pick it up online or after you visit the exhibition (which closes February 2!).

    Jay Sanders and J. Hoberman explore the vibrant underground performance art scene of 1970s New York in the exhibition catalogue for Rituals of Rented Island. Pick it up online or after you visit the exhibition (which closes February 2!).

  11. Photography records the gamut of feelings written on the human face; the beauty of the earth and skies that man has inherited; and the wealth and confusion man has created. It is a major force in explaining man to man.

    — Edward Steichen, whose work is on view in Edward Steichen in the 1920s and 1930s: A Recent Acquisition through February 23.

  12. THROWBACK THURSDAY: Squat Theatre’s Andy Warhol’s Last Love (1978–1981), paired with the collective’s current installation in Rituals of Rented Island: Object Theater, Loft Performance, and the New Psychodrama—Manhattan 1970–1980.

  13. As construction of the Whitney’s future home enters its final year, focus is shifting from structural components to interiors. Here are some striking photos taken recently of the building’s exterior. 

  14. archivesofamericanart:

Meet Juliana Force: not the first female director of the Whitney Museum but the first director of the Whitney Museum. Period.
Juliana Force, ca. 1931 / Cecil Walter Hardy Beaton, photographer. Marchal Landgren papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

    archivesofamericanart:

    Meet Juliana Force: not the first female director of the Whitney Museum but the first director of the Whitney Museum. Period.

    Juliana Force, ca. 1931 / Cecil Walter Hardy Beaton, photographer. Marchal Landgren papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

  15. archivesofamericanart:

This Day in Art History: October 21, 1965. Jackie Kennedy toured the in-process construction of the Whitney Museum with architect Marcel Breuer. The museum opened to the public a little under a year later.
Marcel Breuer and Jacqueline Kennedy touring the construction of the Whitney Museum of American Art, 1965 Oct. 21 / Bob Noble, photographer. Marcel Breuer papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

    archivesofamericanart:

    This Day in Art History: October 21, 1965. Jackie Kennedy toured the in-process construction of the Whitney Museum with architect Marcel Breuer. The museum opened to the public a little under a year later.

    Marcel Breuer and Jacqueline Kennedy touring the construction of the Whitney Museum of American Art, 1965 Oct. 21 / Bob Noble, photographer. Marcel Breuer papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.