1. Photography is nature seen from the eyes outward, painting from the eyes inward.

    — Charles Sheeler, born today in 1883.

  2. Art is something that happens inside us. We look at things in the world, and we become excited by them. We understand our own possibilities of becoming. And that’s what art is.

    — Jeff Koons to The New York Times

  3. What an artist is trying to do for people is to bring them closer to something, because art is about sharing: you wouldn’t be an artist unless you wanted to share an experience, a thought.

    — David Hockney, born today in 1937.

  4. The perfect final show for the Whitney’s building.

    — New York Magazine's Jerry Saltz on Jeff Koons: A Retrospective.

  5. jewelzafra:

Inflatable Flower by Jeff Koons

“The inflatables are really where I think my history as an artist begins.” —Jeff Koons

    jewelzafra:

    Inflatable Flower by Jeff Koons

    “The inflatables are really where I think my history as an artist begins.” —Jeff Koons

  6. “A gripping show. It chronicles a sculptural career that is singular for its profusion of color, crafts and materials; its opening up of historical avenues closed by Minimalism; and its faith in both accessibility and advanced art, that other New. And it’s a great way for the Whitney to decamp, tossing the Met the keys, knowing that we won’t soon forget that it still owns the place.” —The New York Times celebrates Jeff Koons: A Retrospective, opening today. 
Photograph by Fred R. Conrad for The New York Times

    “A gripping show. It chronicles a sculptural career that is singular for its profusion of color, crafts and materials; its opening up of historical avenues closed by Minimalism; and its faith in both accessibility and advanced art, that other New. And it’s a great way for the Whitney to decamp, tossing the Met the keys, knowing that we won’t soon forget that it still owns the place.” —The New York Times celebrates Jeff Koons: A Retrospective, opening today. 

    Photograph by Fred R. Conrad for The New York Times

  7. "My work isn’t about form. It’s about seeing. I’m excited about seeing things and I’m interested in the way I think other people saw things." —Roy Lichtenstein
See his work in American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe through Sunday.

    "My work isn’t about form. It’s about seeing. I’m excited about seeing things and I’m interested in the way I think other people saw things." —Roy Lichtenstein

    See his work in American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe through Sunday.

  8. "What inspires me is feeling. I’m talking about a sense of excitement, of awe and wonder. As a child, you have a kind of openness." —Jeff Koons to Art in America.
Jeff Koons (b. 1955), Bear and Policeman, 1988. Polychromed wood; 85 × 43 × 37 in. (215.9 × 109.2 × 94 cm). Artist’s proof. Collection of Jeffrey Deitch. © Jeff Koons

    "What inspires me is feeling. I’m talking about a sense of excitement, of awe and wonder. As a child, you have a kind of openness." —Jeff Koons to Art in America.

    Jeff Koons (b. 1955), Bear and Policeman, 1988. Polychromed wood; 85 × 43 × 37 in. (215.9 × 109.2 × 94 cm). Artist’s proof. Collection of Jeffrey Deitch. © Jeff Koons

  9. Actual space is intrinsically more powerful and specific than paint on a flat surface.

    — Donald Judd, born today in 1928.

  10. Jeff Koons: A Retrospective, opening June 27, is featured in The New Yorker's summer preview.
Jeff Koons (b. 1955), Split-Rocker (Orange/Red), 1999. Polychromed aluminum; 13 1/2 × 14 1/2 × 13 in. (34.3 × 36.8 × 33 cm). B. Z. and Michael Schwartz. © Jeff Koons

    Jeff Koons: A Retrospective, opening June 27, is featured in The New Yorker's summer preview.

    Jeff Koons (b. 1955), Split-Rocker (Orange/Red), 1999. Polychromed aluminum; 13 1/2 × 14 1/2 × 13 in. (34.3 × 36.8 × 33 cm). B. Z. and Michael Schwartz. © Jeff Koons

  11. "For our system of government to work, there has to be that sway there. Otherwise we’re doomed. We have to question: maybe it’s this way; maybe it’s that way; probably it’s a bit of both. There’s some good in all bad. There’s some bad in all good." —Flawless Sabrina

    New on Whitney Stories: Flawless Sabrina, Biennial artist Zackary Drucker, and senior curatorial assistant Elisabeth Sherman discuss tarot card readings; the first drag contest Flawless Sabrina initiated in 1959; and the ever-changing landscape of New York City. 

  12. If you’re a painter, you’re not alone. There’s no way to be alone.

    — Franz Kline, born today in 1910.

  13. "Should you see it? That’s a silly question. Of course you should! It comes but once every two years, and it sets the baseline for art talk in between." —The New Yorker's Peter Schjeldahl.

    The 2014 Biennial closes Sunday.

  14. I think making art is about bringing into being things that you want to be … If I don’t make them, I won’t see them.

    — Biennial artist Dawoud Bey.

  15. "It’s so grand, and it’s so gold, but it’s an impoverished set of materials. It’s papier mâché. It’s a cheap digital print from Staples, five dollars. It’s trying to get away with grandiosity, but it can’t quite get there." —Carol Jackson. See her work on the second floor of the Biennial. 
Carol Jackson (b. 1962), Youthful Beast, 2013. Acrylic, papier-mâché, and inkjet print. Collection of the artist

    "It’s so grand, and it’s so gold, but it’s an impoverished set of materials. It’s papier mâché. It’s a cheap digital print from Staples, five dollars. It’s trying to get away with grandiosity, but it can’t quite get there." —Carol Jackson. See her work on the second floor of the Biennial

    Carol Jackson (b. 1962), Youthful Beast, 2013. Acrylic, papier-mâché, and inkjet print. Collection of the artist