1. One of the amazing things about art is that it changes every day, and its meaning to you changes every day.

    — Jeff Koons

  2. My purpose is to paint the life of my people as I know it.

    — Romare Bearden

  3. Personally, I have always preferred inspiration to information.

    — Man Ray, born today in 1890. 

  4. I love it when you ask actors, ‘What’re you doing now?’ and they say, ‘I’m between roles.’ To be living ‘life between roles,’ that’s my favorite.

    — Andy Warhol, born today in 1928.

  5. “Art has this ability to allow you to connect back through history in the same way that biology does. I’m always looking for source material.” —Jeff Koons
Installation view Jeff Koons: A Retrospective (June 27–October 19, 2014), Whitney Museum of American Art, N.Y. © Jeff Koons. Photograph by Ron Amstutz

    “Art has this ability to allow you to connect back through history in the same way that biology does. I’m always looking for source material.” —Jeff Koons

    Installation view Jeff Koons: A Retrospective (June 27–October 19, 2014), Whitney Museum of American Art, N.Y. © Jeff Koons. Photograph by Ron Amstutz

  6. "Some commentators have talked about the Rabbit as a spaceman. Others have seen him as the Playboy bunny, or an orator holding up a microphone where the carrot is." —Jeff Koons: A Retrospective curator Scott Rothkopf on Rabbit (1986).

    "Some commentators have talked about the Rabbit as a spaceman. Others have seen him as the Playboy bunny, or an orator holding up a microphone where the carrot is." —Jeff Koons: A Retrospective curator Scott Rothkopf on Rabbit (1986).

  7. Photography is nature seen from the eyes outward, painting from the eyes inward.

    — Charles Sheeler, born today in 1883.

  8. Art is something that happens inside us. We look at things in the world, and we become excited by them. We understand our own possibilities of becoming. And that’s what art is.

    — Jeff Koons to The New York Times

  9. What an artist is trying to do for people is to bring them closer to something, because art is about sharing: you wouldn’t be an artist unless you wanted to share an experience, a thought.

    — David Hockney, born today in 1937.

  10. The perfect final show for the Whitney’s building.

    — New York Magazine's Jerry Saltz on Jeff Koons: A Retrospective.

  11. jewelzafra:

Inflatable Flower by Jeff Koons

“The inflatables are really where I think my history as an artist begins.” —Jeff Koons

    jewelzafra:

    Inflatable Flower by Jeff Koons

    “The inflatables are really where I think my history as an artist begins.” —Jeff Koons

  12. “A gripping show. It chronicles a sculptural career that is singular for its profusion of color, crafts and materials; its opening up of historical avenues closed by Minimalism; and its faith in both accessibility and advanced art, that other New. And it’s a great way for the Whitney to decamp, tossing the Met the keys, knowing that we won’t soon forget that it still owns the place.” —The New York Times celebrates Jeff Koons: A Retrospective, opening today. 
Photograph by Fred R. Conrad for The New York Times

    “A gripping show. It chronicles a sculptural career that is singular for its profusion of color, crafts and materials; its opening up of historical avenues closed by Minimalism; and its faith in both accessibility and advanced art, that other New. And it’s a great way for the Whitney to decamp, tossing the Met the keys, knowing that we won’t soon forget that it still owns the place.” —The New York Times celebrates Jeff Koons: A Retrospective, opening today. 

    Photograph by Fred R. Conrad for The New York Times

  13. "My work isn’t about form. It’s about seeing. I’m excited about seeing things and I’m interested in the way I think other people saw things." —Roy Lichtenstein
See his work in American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe through Sunday.

    "My work isn’t about form. It’s about seeing. I’m excited about seeing things and I’m interested in the way I think other people saw things." —Roy Lichtenstein

    See his work in American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe through Sunday.

  14. "What inspires me is feeling. I’m talking about a sense of excitement, of awe and wonder. As a child, you have a kind of openness." —Jeff Koons to Art in America.
Jeff Koons (b. 1955), Bear and Policeman, 1988. Polychromed wood; 85 × 43 × 37 in. (215.9 × 109.2 × 94 cm). Artist’s proof. Collection of Jeffrey Deitch. © Jeff Koons

    "What inspires me is feeling. I’m talking about a sense of excitement, of awe and wonder. As a child, you have a kind of openness." —Jeff Koons to Art in America.

    Jeff Koons (b. 1955), Bear and Policeman, 1988. Polychromed wood; 85 × 43 × 37 in. (215.9 × 109.2 × 94 cm). Artist’s proof. Collection of Jeffrey Deitch. © Jeff Koons

  15. Actual space is intrinsically more powerful and specific than paint on a flat surface.

    — Donald Judd, born today in 1928.