1. Planning to attend Jeff Koons: A Retrospective? Listen to the audio guide, featuring commentary by Jeff Koons and curator Scott Rothkopf, among others.
Installation view Jeff Koons: A Retrospective (June 27–October 19, 2014) Whitney Museum of American Art, N.Y. © Jeff Koons. Photograph by Ron Amstutz

    Planning to attend Jeff Koons: A Retrospective? Listen to the audio guide, featuring commentary by Jeff Koons and curator Scott Rothkopf, among others.

    Installation view Jeff Koons: A Retrospective (June 27–October 19, 2014) Whitney Museum of American Art, N.Y. © Jeff Koons. Photograph by Ron Amstutz

  2. Today, the two artists with whom the Whitney has been most closely identified were born: Edward Hopper in 1882 and Alexander Calder in 1898. You can see their work on the fifth-floor mezzanine. 

    Today, the two artists with whom the Whitney has been most closely identified were born: Edward Hopper in 1882 and Alexander Calder in 1898. You can see their work on the fifth-floor mezzanine

  3. Detail of Jeff Koons's Play-Doh (1994–2014) via lizacharlesworth1.

    Detail of Jeff Koons's Play-Doh (1994–2014) via lizacharlesworth1.

  4. Art is something that happens inside us. We look at things in the world, and we become excited by them. We understand our own possibilities of becoming. And that’s what art is.

    — Jeff Koons to The New York Times

  5. Examining the breadth and depth of thirty-five years of work by Jeff Koons, one of the most influential and controversial artists of the twentieth century, the Jeff Koons: A Retrospective exhibition catalogue features all of the artist’s most well-known pieces. 
Read the introductory essay by curator Scott Rothkopf on whitney.org.

    Examining the breadth and depth of thirty-five years of work by Jeff Koons, one of the most influential and controversial artists of the twentieth century, the Jeff Koons: A Retrospective exhibition catalogue features all of the artist’s most well-known pieces. 

    Read the introductory essay by curator Scott Rothkopf on whitney.org.

  6. For his Banality series, Jeff Koons worked with traditional German and Italian craftsmen to enlarge the subjects and render them in gilt porcelain and polychromed wood, materials more associated with housewares and tchotchkes than contemporary art.
Photograph via mcmondays.

    For his Banality series, Jeff Koons worked with traditional German and Italian craftsmen to enlarge the subjects and render them in gilt porcelain and polychromed wood, materials more associated with housewares and tchotchkes than contemporary art.

    Photograph via mcmondays.

  7. "A strong case for the rigor and, often, the beauty of Koons’s art." The New Yorker reviews Jeff Koons: A Retrospective.
Jeff Koons (b. 1955), Rabbit, 1986. Stainless steel; 41 × 19 × 12 in. (104.1 × 48.3 × 30.5 cm). Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago; partial gift of Stefan T. Edlis and H. Gael Neeson, 2000.21. © Jeff Koons

    "A strong case for the rigor and, often, the beauty of Koons’s art." The New Yorker reviews Jeff Koons: A Retrospective.

    Jeff Koons (b. 1955), Rabbit, 1986. Stainless steel; 41 × 19 × 12 in. (104.1 × 48.3 × 30.5 cm). Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago; partial gift of Stefan T. Edlis and H. Gael Neeson, 2000.21. © Jeff Koons

  8. The Museum Shop is excited to announce a limited-edition Play-Doh plate designed by Jeff Koons with Bernardaud, made exclusively for the Whitney in conjunction with the opening of his retrospective.

    The Museum Shop is excited to announce a limited-edition Play-Doh plate designed by Jeff Koons with Bernardaud, made exclusively for the Whitney in conjunction with the opening of his retrospective.

  9. jewelzafra:

Inflatable Flower by Jeff Koons

“The inflatables are really where I think my history as an artist begins.” —Jeff Koons

    jewelzafra:

    Inflatable Flower by Jeff Koons

    “The inflatables are really where I think my history as an artist begins.” —Jeff Koons

  10. FINAL WEEKEND! American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe closes Sunday. 

    FINAL WEEKEND! American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe closes Sunday. 

  11. “A gripping show. It chronicles a sculptural career that is singular for its profusion of color, crafts and materials; its opening up of historical avenues closed by Minimalism; and its faith in both accessibility and advanced art, that other New. And it’s a great way for the Whitney to decamp, tossing the Met the keys, knowing that we won’t soon forget that it still owns the place.” —The New York Times celebrates Jeff Koons: A Retrospective, opening today. 
Photograph by Fred R. Conrad for The New York Times

    “A gripping show. It chronicles a sculptural career that is singular for its profusion of color, crafts and materials; its opening up of historical avenues closed by Minimalism; and its faith in both accessibility and advanced art, that other New. And it’s a great way for the Whitney to decamp, tossing the Met the keys, knowing that we won’t soon forget that it still owns the place.” —The New York Times celebrates Jeff Koons: A Retrospective, opening today. 

    Photograph by Fred R. Conrad for The New York Times

  12. This Sunday evening, curator Scott Rothkopf will talk about the making of Jeff Koons: A Retrospective with writer and catalogue contributor Rachel Kushner. Get your tickets now.

    This Sunday evening, curator Scott Rothkopf will talk about the making of Jeff Koons: A Retrospective with writer and catalogue contributor Rachel Kushner. Get your tickets now.

  13. Jeff Koons’s Balloon Dog, Cat on a Clothesline, and Play-Doh reflected in Moon (Light Pink).

    Jeff Koons’s Balloon Dog, Cat on a Clothesline, and Play-Doh reflected in Moon (Light Pink).

  14. Follow us on Twitter and Instagram today for live coverage from the Jeff Koons: A Retrospective press preview and cocktail reception.
Jeff Koons (b. 1955), Michael Jackson and Bubbles, 1988. Porcelain; 42 x 70 1/2 x 32 1/2 in. (106.7 x 179.1 x 82.6 cm). Private collection. © Jeff Koons

    Follow us on Twitter and Instagram today for live coverage from the Jeff Koons: A Retrospective press preview and cocktail reception.

    Jeff Koons (b. 1955), Michael Jackson and Bubbles, 1988. Porcelain; 42 x 70 1/2 x 32 1/2 in. (106.7 x 179.1 x 82.6 cm). Private collection. © Jeff Koons

  15. "What inspires me is feeling. I’m talking about a sense of excitement, of awe and wonder. As a child, you have a kind of openness." —Jeff Koons to Art in America.
Jeff Koons (b. 1955), Bear and Policeman, 1988. Polychromed wood; 85 × 43 × 37 in. (215.9 × 109.2 × 94 cm). Artist’s proof. Collection of Jeffrey Deitch. © Jeff Koons

    "What inspires me is feeling. I’m talking about a sense of excitement, of awe and wonder. As a child, you have a kind of openness." —Jeff Koons to Art in America.

    Jeff Koons (b. 1955), Bear and Policeman, 1988. Polychromed wood; 85 × 43 × 37 in. (215.9 × 109.2 × 94 cm). Artist’s proof. Collection of Jeffrey Deitch. © Jeff Koons