1. Sketch of a Jeff Koons selfie by 1011drawings.

    Sketch of a Jeff Koons selfie by 1011drawings.

  2. A look at the fourth floor galleries of Jeff Koons: A Retrospective.

  3. The sculptures in Jeff Koons's Banality series are mash-ups of stuffed animals, gift shop figurines, and images taken from magazines, product packaging, films, and even Leonardo da Vinci.

  4. A reflection in Jeff Koons's Balloon Venus (Orange) (2008–12).

    A reflection in Jeff Koons's Balloon Venus (Orange) (2008–12).

  5. Visitors who are blind or partially sighted and their companions joined us for a tour of Jeff Koons: A Retrospective conducted through verbal description and touch. Learn more about access programs at the Whitney.

  6. Members enjoy unlimited express admission to Jeff Koons: A Retrospective.
Photograph by Matthew Carasella

    Members enjoy unlimited express admission to Jeff Koons: A Retrospective.

    Photograph by Matthew Carasella

  7. blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC: It’s that time you’ve all (not?) been waiting for: It’s KOONS-O-RAMA time, when I make my weekly visit (and genuflection) to the Jeff Koons retrospective at the Whitney museum in New York.
This is Cat on a Clothesline (Aqua), dated 1994 to 2001, and I think it is the masterpiece of the survey, and the apotheosis of Koons’s career.
I won’t comment here on its place in the long tradition of crucifixion imagery, or on its contribution to the story of the lion in art.
I just want to point out the utterly peculiar place in takes up in the more recent history of the readymade. You’d have to call this piece an adapted-imagined-enlarged readymade.
Its roots are in a real type of found object: The photo of a cat in a sock that is a minor Internet meme. Koons found one that sparked his interest, but then he adapted it to his needs by reshooting it with his own kitten and sock and line.  Those photographic roots are shallow, however, because the real source for this object is a cast-plastic toy, such as you might find in one of your nastier dollar stores – but a toy that has only been imagined by Koons, rather than actually purchased or seen. (It’s as though Duchamp imagined up a new kind of urinal – which some have said he did.)
Koons’s piece perfectly duplicates every telltale detail of his (non-existent) found object, down to its lousy casting seams, buttery surfaces and magic-marker colors. Except, of course, that it does so on a monumental scale, as no normal readymade ever would.
Or maybe this is a commemorative monument to the idea of the readymade itself, prepared for placement in your local museum plaza. The man on a horse gets replaced by the cat in a sock; a tribute to military valor gives way to a tribute to artistic genius. (The Broad Art Foundation, Santa Monica, © Jeff Koons; photo by Lucy Hogg)
The Daily Pic also appears at ArtnetNews.com. For a full survey of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive

    blakegopnik:

    THE DAILY PIC: It’s that time you’ve all (not?) been waiting for: It’s KOONS-O-RAMA time, when I make my weekly visit (and genuflection) to the Jeff Koons retrospective at the Whitney museum in New York.

    This is Cat on a Clothesline (Aqua), dated 1994 to 2001, and I think it is the masterpiece of the survey, and the apotheosis of Koons’s career.

    I won’t comment here on its place in the long tradition of crucifixion imagery, or on its contribution to the story of the lion in art.

    I just want to point out the utterly peculiar place in takes up in the more recent history of the readymade. You’d have to call this piece an adapted-imagined-enlarged readymade.

    Its roots are in a real type of found object: The photo of a cat in a sock that is a minor Internet meme. Koons found one that sparked his interest, but then he adapted it to his needs by reshooting it with his own kitten and sock and line.  Those photographic roots are shallow, however, because the real source for this object is a cast-plastic toy, such as you might find in one of your nastier dollar stores – but a toy that has only been imagined by Koons, rather than actually purchased or seen. (It’s as though Duchamp imagined up a new kind of urinal – which some have said he did.)

    Koons’s piece perfectly duplicates every telltale detail of his (non-existent) found object, down to its lousy casting seams, buttery surfaces and magic-marker colors. Except, of course, that it does so on a monumental scale, as no normal readymade ever would.

    Or maybe this is a commemorative monument to the idea of the readymade itself, prepared for placement in your local museum plaza. The man on a horse gets replaced by the cat in a sock; a tribute to military valor gives way to a tribute to artistic genius. (The Broad Art Foundation, Santa Monica, © Jeff Koons; photo by Lucy Hogg)

    The Daily Pic also appears at ArtnetNews.com. For a full survey of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive

  8. Jeff Koons: A Retrospective is full of reflective surfaces. Tag your best #Koons #ArtSelfie with @whitneymuseum on Twitter and Instagram. We’re regramming our favorites every week.

    Jeff Koons: A Retrospective is full of reflective surfaces. Tag your best #Koons #ArtSelfie with @whitneymuseum on Twitter and Instagram. We’re regramming our favorites every week.

  9. Visiting Jeff Koons: A Retrospective? Listen to the audio guide, featuring commentary by the artist and curator Scott Rothkopf, among others.
Installation view Jeff Koons: A Retrospective (June 27–October 19, 2014) Whitney Museum of American Art, N.Y. © Jeff Koons. Photograph by Ron Amstutz

    Visiting Jeff Koons: A Retrospective? Listen to the audio guide, featuring commentary by the artist and curator Scott Rothkopf, among others.

    Installation view Jeff Koons: A Retrospective (June 27–October 19, 2014) Whitney Museum of American Art, N.Y. © Jeff Koons. Photograph by Ron Amstutz

  10. A look at the third floor galleries of Jeff Koons: A Retrospective.

  11. Did you know these inflatable pool toys will never pop? Learn more on whitney.org.
Installation view Jeff Koons: A Retrospective (June 27–October 19, 2014), Whitney Museum of American Art, N.Y. © Jeff Koons. Photograph by Ron Amstutz

    Did you know these inflatable pool toys will never pop? Learn more on whitney.org.

    Installation view Jeff Koons: A Retrospective (June 27–October 19, 2014), Whitney Museum of American Art, N.Y. © Jeff Koons. Photograph by Ron Amstutz

  12. Jeff Koons’s Play-Doh is made up of twenty-seven individual interlocking pieces of painted aluminum and took two decades to fabricate. Definitely not child’s play! 

    Jeff Koons’s Play-Doh is made up of twenty-seven individual interlocking pieces of painted aluminum and took two decades to fabricate. Definitely not child’s play! 

  13. Jeff Koons: A Retrospective is Koons’s first major museum presentation in New York, and the first to fill nearly the entirety of the Whitney’s Marcel Breuer building with a single artist’s work. Here’s a look at the works on view in the Museum’s Lobby and Sculpture Court.

  14. Jeff Koons's One Ball Total Equilibrium Tank (Spalding Dr. J 241 Series) (1985).
Photograph by manbartlett

    Jeff Koons's One Ball Total Equilibrium Tank (Spalding Dr. J 241 Series) (1985).

    Photograph by manbartlett

  15. Jeff Koons cleaning acrylic cases for a work in the New series, c. 1985.

    Jeff Koons cleaning acrylic cases for a work in the New series, c. 1985.