1. Visiting Jeff Koons: A Retrospective? Listen to the audio guide, featuring commentary by the artist and curator Scott Rothkopf, among others.
Installation view Jeff Koons: A Retrospective (June 27–October 19, 2014) Whitney Museum of American Art, N.Y. © Jeff Koons. Photograph by Ron Amstutz

    Visiting Jeff Koons: A Retrospective? Listen to the audio guide, featuring commentary by the artist and curator Scott Rothkopf, among others.

    Installation view Jeff Koons: A Retrospective (June 27–October 19, 2014) Whitney Museum of American Art, N.Y. © Jeff Koons. Photograph by Ron Amstutz

  2. A look at the third floor galleries of Jeff Koons: A Retrospective.

  3. Did you know these inflatable pool toys will never pop? Learn more on whitney.org.
Installation view Jeff Koons: A Retrospective (June 27–October 19, 2014), Whitney Museum of American Art, N.Y. © Jeff Koons. Photograph by Ron Amstutz

    Did you know these inflatable pool toys will never pop? Learn more on whitney.org.

    Installation view Jeff Koons: A Retrospective (June 27–October 19, 2014), Whitney Museum of American Art, N.Y. © Jeff Koons. Photograph by Ron Amstutz

  4. Jeff Koons’s Play-Doh is made up of twenty-seven individual interlocking pieces of painted aluminum and took two decades to fabricate. Definitely not child’s play! 

    Jeff Koons’s Play-Doh is made up of twenty-seven individual interlocking pieces of painted aluminum and took two decades to fabricate. Definitely not child’s play! 

  5. Jeff Koons: A Retrospective is Koons’s first major museum presentation in New York, and the first to fill nearly the entirety of the Whitney’s Marcel Breuer building with a single artist’s work. Here’s a look at the works on view in the Museum’s Lobby and Sculpture Court.

  6. Jeff Koons's One Ball Total Equilibrium Tank (Spalding Dr. J 241 Series) (1985).
Photograph by manbartlett

    Jeff Koons's One Ball Total Equilibrium Tank (Spalding Dr. J 241 Series) (1985).

    Photograph by manbartlett

  7. Jeff Koons cleaning acrylic cases for a work in the New series, c. 1985.

    Jeff Koons cleaning acrylic cases for a work in the New series, c. 1985.

  8. Jeff Koons's Woman in Tub (1988), part of the artist’s Banality series.
Photograph by kellyturso

    Jeff Koons's Woman in Tub (1988), part of the artist’s Banality series.

    Photograph by kellyturso

  9. This ball hovers with help from a physicist. Learn more on whitney.org.
Installation view Jeff Koons: A Retrospective (June 27–October 19, 2014), Whitney Museum of American Art, N.Y. © Jeff Koons. Photograph by Ron Amstutz

    This ball hovers with help from a physicist. Learn more on whitney.org.

    Installation view Jeff Koons: A Retrospective (June 27–October 19, 2014), Whitney Museum of American Art, N.Y. © Jeff Koons. Photograph by Ron Amstutz

  10. “Art has this ability to allow you to connect back through history in the same way that biology does. I’m always looking for source material.” —Jeff Koons
Installation view Jeff Koons: A Retrospective (June 27–October 19, 2014), Whitney Museum of American Art, N.Y. © Jeff Koons. Photograph by Ron Amstutz

    “Art has this ability to allow you to connect back through history in the same way that biology does. I’m always looking for source material.” —Jeff Koons

    Installation view Jeff Koons: A Retrospective (June 27–October 19, 2014), Whitney Museum of American Art, N.Y. © Jeff Koons. Photograph by Ron Amstutz

  11. Fun fact: Richard Artschwager made the toothpick for Claes Oldenburg's Giant BLT (Bacon, Lettuce, and Tomato Sandwich) (1963).
Photo via restaurantgroupie.

    Fun fact: Richard Artschwager made the toothpick for Claes Oldenburg's Giant BLT (Bacon, Lettuce, and Tomato Sandwich) (1963).

    Photo via restaurantgroupie.

  12. Planning to attend Jeff Koons: A Retrospective? Listen to the audio guide, featuring commentary by Jeff Koons and curator Scott Rothkopf, among others.
Installation view Jeff Koons: A Retrospective (June 27–October 19, 2014) Whitney Museum of American Art, N.Y. © Jeff Koons. Photograph by Ron Amstutz

    Planning to attend Jeff Koons: A Retrospective? Listen to the audio guide, featuring commentary by Jeff Koons and curator Scott Rothkopf, among others.

    Installation view Jeff Koons: A Retrospective (June 27–October 19, 2014) Whitney Museum of American Art, N.Y. © Jeff Koons. Photograph by Ron Amstutz

  13. Today, the two artists with whom the Whitney has been most closely identified were born: Edward Hopper in 1882 and Alexander Calder in 1898. You can see their work on the fifth-floor mezzanine. 

    Today, the two artists with whom the Whitney has been most closely identified were born: Edward Hopper in 1882 and Alexander Calder in 1898. You can see their work on the fifth-floor mezzanine

  14. Detail of Jeff Koons's Play-Doh (1994–2014) via lizacharlesworth1.

    Detail of Jeff Koons's Play-Doh (1994–2014) via lizacharlesworth1.

  15. Art is something that happens inside us. We look at things in the world, and we become excited by them. We understand our own possibilities of becoming. And that’s what art is.

    — Jeff Koons to The New York Times