1. Cory Arcangel has been included in several exhibitions at the Whitney, among them the 2004 Biennial and his 2011 full-floor solo show, Pro Tools—both before the age of 35. In this Whitney Stories video, Arcangel speaks about his relationship to pop culture and avant-garde art, the complexities of working in the constantly-evolving realm of new media, and his history of taking risks at the Whitney.

  2. Miss our Shared Spaces symposium on the museum in the age of social media? We documented the evening—peruse videos on whitney.org.
Enxuto & Love (2009), Anonymous Painting 3D #V2 GE_W202_03, 2013. Inkjet on cotton, 40 x 52 inches. Courtesy the artists

    Miss our Shared Spaces symposium on the museum in the age of social media? We documented the evening—peruse videos on whitney.org.

    Enxuto & Love (2009), Anonymous Painting 3D #V2 GE_W202_03, 2013. Inkjet on cotton, 40 x 52 inches. Courtesy the artists

  3. This Tuesday, join us for Shared Spaces: Social Media and Museum Structures, a two-part symposium addressing the transformation of the museum in the age of social media.
Cory Arcangel (b. 1978), Yada, Yada, Yada, 2013

    This Tuesday, join us for Shared Spaces: Social Media and Museum Structures, a two-part symposium addressing the transformation of the museum in the age of social media.

    Cory Arcangel (b. 1978), Yada, Yada, Yada, 2013

  4. "The pieces explore how information can be layered, obscured, and complicated to create beauty." Wired on Test Pattern, on view through Sunday.

  5. On view through Sunday, David Hockney: The Jugglers marks the U.S. premiere of Hockney’s first video installation. Filmed by eighteen cameras, a group of jugglers make up a vibrantly kinetic composition as they move across a grid of eighteen screens, accompanied by a lively musical soundtrack.
David Hockney (b. 1937), The Jugglers, June 24th 2012, 2012 (installation view, Whitney Museum of American Art). Eighteen-screen video installation, color, sound; 9 min. © David Hockney. Photograph by Sheldan C. Collins

    On view through Sunday, David Hockney: The Jugglers marks the U.S. premiere of Hockney’s first video installation. Filmed by eighteen cameras, a group of jugglers make up a vibrantly kinetic composition as they move across a grid of eighteen screens, accompanied by a lively musical soundtrack.

    David Hockney (b. 1937), The Jugglers, June 24th 2012, 2012 (installation view, Whitney Museum of American Art). Eighteen-screen video installation, color, sound; 9 min. © David Hockney. Photograph by Sheldan C. Collins

  6. Joseph Stella—one of the first American artists to glorify the new technologies of urban modernity—was born today in 1877. The Brooklyn Bridge was his most iconic subject. See more of the artist’s work in American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe.
Joseph Stella (1877–1946), The Brooklyn Bridge: Variation on an Old Theme, 1939. Oil on canvas, 70 × 42 in. (177.8 × 106.7 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase 42.15

    Joseph Stella—one of the first American artists to glorify the new technologies of urban modernity—was born today in 1877. The Brooklyn Bridge was his most iconic subject. See more of the artist’s work in American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe.

    Joseph Stella (1877–1946), The Brooklyn Bridge: Variation on an Old Theme, 1939. Oil on canvas, 70 × 42 in. (177.8 × 106.7 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase 42.15

  7. Check out this video in which curator Scott Rothkopf discusses the production of Wade Guyton’s eight-panel painting, Untitled (2008), and its connection to our relationship with technology. The work is on view through Sunday in Wade Guyton OS.

  8. In 2002, Wade Guyton invented a new paintbrush. Its name was the Epson printer.

    — Jerry Saltz of New York magazine gives “huge props” to Wade Guyton. Wade Guyton OS is on view through January 13. 

  9. "Painting, Rebooted": The New York Times on Wade Guyton, whose midcareer retrospective opens at the Whitney October 4.
Photograph by Karsten Moran for The New York Times

    "Painting, Rebooted": The New York Times on Wade Guyton, whose midcareer retrospective opens at the Whitney October 4.

    Photograph by Karsten Moran for The New York Times


  10. John Kelsey, Depesrsion, Impoetnce, 2012. 

    Kelsey repurposed found language from spam emails for these “poems,” which he presents on paper featuring the old Whitney Museum insignia, the eagle. The lists of names indicate the emails’ senders, the titles are drawn from the subject lines, and the “stanzas” consist of the seemingly random, cut and pasted content of the messages. 

    Bottom right photograph by Tyko