1. A look at the second floor of the 2014 Biennial, curated by Anthony Elms. 

  2. This week, Academy Records presents two works running simultaneously in the Film and Video Gallery. The Bower, a film loop of blossoming cherry trees, plays continuously over the three-hour audio work No Jets, a field recording of the flight path to Chicago’s O’Hare airport during the flight delay after the September 11, 2001 attacks.
Academy Records, still from The Bower, 2011-13. 16mm film, color, silent; approx. 1:30 minutes, looped. Collection of the artist. Courtesy the artist. © Stephen Lacy

    This week, Academy Records presents two works running simultaneously in the Film and Video Gallery. The Bower, a film loop of blossoming cherry trees, plays continuously over the three-hour audio work No Jets, a field recording of the flight path to Chicago’s O’Hare airport during the flight delay after the September 11, 2001 attacks.

    Academy Records, still from The Bower, 2011-13. 16mm film, color, silent; approx. 1:30 minutes, looped. Collection of the artist. Courtesy the artist. © Stephen Lacy

  3. This Saturday, bring your kids to celebrate what’s happening now in contemporary art at our 2014 Biennial Family Party. Families will participate in interactive tours, gallery activities, and an art workshop. 
Keith Mayerson (b. 1966), My Family, 2013. Oil on linen, 56 × 70 in. © Keith Mayerson; courtesy the artist and Derek Eller Gallery, NY. Photograph by Tom Powel Imaging

    This Saturday, bring your kids to celebrate what’s happening now in contemporary art at our 2014 Biennial Family Party. Families will participate in interactive tours, gallery activities, and an art workshop. 

    Keith Mayerson (b. 1966), My Family, 2013. Oil on linen, 56 × 70 in. © Keith Mayerson; courtesy the artist and Derek Eller Gallery, NY. Photograph by Tom Powel Imaging

  4. For the first Biennial, artists—among them Grant Wood, Arshile Gorky, and Georgia O’Keeffe—were invited to submit works of their own choosing, continuing the tradition of nonjuried exhibitions surveying new American art which began at the Whitney Studio Club in 1918.
Installation view of the First Biennial Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting, November 23, 1932–January 5, 1933, Whitney Museum of American Art

    For the first Biennial, artists—among them Grant Wood, Arshile Gorky, and Georgia O’Keeffe—were invited to submit works of their own choosing, continuing the tradition of nonjuried exhibitions surveying new American art which began at the Whitney Studio Club in 1918.

    Installation view of the First Biennial Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting, November 23, 1932–January 5, 1933, Whitney Museum of American Art

  5. “When in doubt, spray paint it gold.” —Rebecca Morris in her manifesto, For Abstractionists and Friends of the Non-Objective, a tongue-in-cheek yet absolutely sincere call to arms for practitioners of the form. See her work on the second floor of the Biennial.

    “When in doubt, spray paint it gold.” —Rebecca Morris in her manifesto, For Abstractionists and Friends of the Non-Objective, a tongue-in-cheek yet absolutely sincere call to arms for practitioners of the form. See her work on the second floor of the Biennial.

  6. Susan Howe’s poems on view in the 2014 Biennial draw on a wide variety of texts, spanning American, British, and Irish poetry and folklore as well as critical and art historical sources. She cuts out sentences and fragments of pages, pasting and taping them to create a new text that retains the typefaces, spacing, and rhythms of the originals. These compositions are then made into letterpress prints.
Susan Howe, Untitled (from Tom Tit Tot), 2013. Letterpress print, 12 × 9 in. (30.5 × 22.9 cm). Collection of the artist. © Susan Howe

    Susan Howe’s poems on view in the 2014 Biennial draw on a wide variety of texts, spanning American, British, and Irish poetry and folklore as well as critical and art historical sources. She cuts out sentences and fragments of pages, pasting and taping them to create a new text that retains the typefaces, spacing, and rhythms of the originals. These compositions are then made into letterpress prints.

    Susan Howe, Untitled (from Tom Tit Tot), 2013. Letterpress print, 12 × 9 in. (30.5 × 22.9 cm). Collection of the artist. © Susan Howe

  7. During the nearly fifteen years that Vincent Punch has been a guard at the Whitney, he has seen myriad exhibitions, snapped countless candid photos, and developed a distinct eye for spontaneous visual arrangements that take place every day in the galleries. In this Whitney Stories video, he shares his observations on working as a guard, and offers his unique perspective on the Whitney and its future.

  8. Zackary Drucker and Rhys Ernst’s collaborative short film She Gone Rogue is screening every half hour during Museum hours, beginning at 11:15 am.

    Zackary Drucker and Rhys Ernst’s collaborative short film She Gone Rogue is screening every half hour during Museum hours, beginning at 11:15 am.

  9. Exploring the 2014 Biennial this weekend? Pick up a free Whitney Guide in the Lobby, a Windows Phone app created exclusively for the Biennial featuring interviews with artists, commentary from the curators, and a tour for kids.

    Exploring the 2014 Biennial this weekend? Pick up a free Whitney Guide in the Lobby, a Windows Phone app created exclusively for the Biennial featuring interviews with artists, commentary from the curators, and a tour for kids.

  10. The 2014 Biennial is on view through May 25. See it today at the Whitney, or everywhere else tomorrow. 

    The 2014 Biennial is on view through May 25. See it today at the Whitney, or everywhere else tomorrow. 

  11. nicks-lunchbox-service:

Later than lunchtime drawing: The Whitney Museum under construction on Gansevoort Street, where The High Line begins.

    nicks-lunchbox-service:

    Later than lunchtime drawing: The Whitney Museum under construction on Gansevoort Street, where The High Line begins.

  12. Shio Kusaka’s ceramic pots, bowls, and vases are “poetic, seductive vessels” says Architectural Digest. See them on the fourth floor.

    Shio Kusaka’s ceramic pots, bowls, and vases are “poetic, seductive vessels” says Architectural Digest. See them on the fourth floor.

  13. Join us for the third and final week of screenings featuring the work of Lucien Castaing-Taylor, Véréna Paravel, and Sensory Ethnography Lab. This week’s screenings include a rotating selection of work by filmmakers Diana Allan, Ilisa Barbash, Lucien Castaing-Taylor, Libbie Cohn, Aryo Danusiri, Ernst Karel, Toby Kim Lee, Helen Mirra, Véréna Paravel, Xu Ruotao, J.P. Sniadecki, Stephanie Spray, Katherine Tygielski, Pacho Velez, Pawel Wojtasi, and Huang Xiang. Visit whitney.org for a full schedule. 
Lucien Castaing-Taylor (b. 1966) and Véréna Paravel (b. 1971), still from Leviathan, 2012. Single-channel video, color, sound, 87 minutes. Courtesy Cinema Guild

    Join us for the third and final week of screenings featuring the work of Lucien Castaing-Taylor, Véréna Paravel, and Sensory Ethnography Lab. This week’s screenings include a rotating selection of work by filmmakers Diana Allan, Ilisa Barbash, Lucien Castaing-Taylor, Libbie Cohn, Aryo Danusiri, Ernst Karel, Toby Kim Lee, Helen Mirra, Véréna Paravel, Xu Ruotao, J.P. Sniadecki, Stephanie Spray, Katherine Tygielski, Pacho Velez, Pawel Wojtasi, and Huang Xiang. Visit whitney.org for a full schedule. 

    Lucien Castaing-Taylor (b. 1966) and Véréna Paravel (b. 1971), still from Leviathan, 2012. Single-channel video, color, sound, 87 minutes. Courtesy Cinema Guild

  14. Peter Schuyff makes the carvings on view in the Biennial by holding a knife in place and rhythmically moving a pencil along its edge—all without looking at what he’s doing.

    Peter Schuyff makes the carvings on view in the Biennial by holding a knife in place and rhythmically moving a pencil along its edge—all without looking at what he’s doing.

  15. Semiotext(e) has produced twenty-eight pamphlets as part of its contribution to the 2014 Biennial, written by philosophers, writers, and critics associated with the press. The series includes new, commissioned works, as well as previously unpublished texts by such influential twentieth-century figures as Simone Weil, Julio Cortazar, and Jean Baudrillard. Purchase the entire set at the Museum Shop.

    Semiotext(e) has produced twenty-eight pamphlets as part of its contribution to the 2014 Biennial, written by philosophers, writers, and critics associated with the press. The series includes new, commissioned works, as well as previously unpublished texts by such influential twentieth-century figures as Simone Weil, Julio Cortazar, and Jean Baudrillard. Purchase the entire set at the Museum Shop.